Programs of Study

Undergraduate Program Information

The Department of Anthropology at the University of Toronto St. George offers undergraduate programs in Anthropology (general) and its subdisciplines.
The following program requirements are based on the 2016-2017 Arts and Science Calendar. You must follow the program requirements of the year that you enrolled in the program. Program requirements from previous years can be found in previous Calendars.

Anthropology (General-Arts Program) Major, Minor : Description, Curriculum, Major Requirements, Minor Requirements
Anthropology (Society, Culture and Language – Arts Program) Specialist, Major:  DescriptionCurriculum, Specialist Requirements, Major Requirements
Anthropology (Evolutionary-Science Program) Major: Description, CurriculumRequirements
Archaeology (Arts Program) Specialist, Major, Minor: Description, CurriculumSpecialist Requirements, Major Requirements, Minor Requirements
Environmental Anthropology (Arts Program) Minor: Requirements
Anthropology Groups
Archaeology Groups

PROGRAMS: Enrolment in the Specialist, Major and Minor programs is limited to students that meet the admission requirements. Please note that the admission requirements vary by program. See below for the admission requirements. Students may enrol at the end of First Year or at any later time if they meet the admission requirements.

Notes:

*: ANT courses are those offered with the following prefixes: ANT, ABS, ARH, HAJ, JAH, JAL and JGA

Course: Full (Y) courses or equivalent in Half (H) courses

; , = AND / = OR

Photo of 10 000 Buddhas Monastery, Sha Tin, Hong Kong
10 000 Buddhas Monastery, Sha Tin, Hong Kong. Photo by Kristy Bard.
Anthropology (General-Arts Program): Major, Minor

Program description and objectives

The Anthropology Major and Minor (General) programs are aimed at students who seek a broad understanding of the origins, patterns, and dimensions of human development and diversity.

Students in the programs will have the opportunity to experience the full breadth of anthropological scholarship on the human past, human evolution, and human languages, societies and cultures. While offering a broad introduction to the discipline as a whole, the programs also encourage students to develop expertise in fields of anthropological scholarship that transcend subdisciplinary boundaries. These programs will appeal to students who wish to develop a multi-dimensional anthropological approach to topics such as: health and disease, sex and gender, urban development, technology and society, material cultures, and the human environment nexus.

The Major and Minor programs in Anthropology (General) aim to provide students with an education in “four-field anthropology” that meets the highest academic standards and allows them to develop their capacities to think clearly and critically, take account of a range of scholarly perspectives, make sound judgments, and contribute constructively to society.

Curriculum and program delivery

Courses in the program are clustered into three areas of study: Archaeology, Evolutionary Anthropology, and Society, Culture and Language (SCL). In their first two years, students take introductory and foundational courses in the discipline and a selection of its substantive areas. In these years they will acquire a thorough understanding of the scope of anthropology and its centrality to understanding the origins, patterns, and dimensions of human development and diversity. They will also learn the core concepts, theories and methodologies of Anthropology as developed in at least two areas of subdisciplinary research. Students in the Major will take a foundational course in SCL and either Evolutionary Anthropology or Archaeology. Those in the Minor can choose from subdisciplinary foundational courses.

In their third and fourth years, students in the Major are encouraged to delve deeply into one of the subdisciplinary areas of study, while retaining a concentration in another area. Through in-depth exposure to two sub-disciplines, students will gain a critical appreciation for, and a practical capacity to engage in multi-disciplinary analyses involving both scientific and social scientific methodologies. Students in the Minor are given the flexibility to take any upper-level courses they choose, providing they build upon the foundational courses they have already taken.

Anthropology (General-Arts Program) Major Requirements

(6.5 full courses or their equivalent)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT100Y1 with a final mark of at least 67% or ANT200Y1 or ANT203Y1 or ANT204H1 or ANT207H1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First and/or Second Year

1. ANT100Y1
2. ANT207H1
3. 1.0 FCE from ANT200Y1, ANT203Y1
4. 0.5 from ANT204H1, ANT208H1, ANT253H1

Upper years

5. 2.5 FCE at the 300+ level from either Group A or Group B, or Group C, including at least 0.5 FCE at the 400-level.
6. 1.0 additional FCE from a Group other than that used to meet requirement #5

Anthropology (General-Arts Program) Minor Requirements

(4 full courses or their equivalent including at least one 300-level course; excluding ANT497Y/ANT498H/ ANT499H)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT100Y1 with a final mark of at least 67% or ANT200Y1 or ANT203Y1 or ANT204H1 or ANT207H1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First and/or Second Year

1. ANT100Y1

2. 2 FCE’s from ANT200Y1, ANT203Y1, ANT204H, ANT207H1, ANT208H, ANT253H1

Upper years

3. One full course equivalent at the 300+ level from either Group A or Group B or Group C

Barra da Tijuca beach, Rio de Janiero. Photo by Kristy Bard.
Barra da Tijuca beach, Rio de Janiero. Photo by Kristy Bard.
Anthropology (Society, Culture, and Language – Arts Program): Specialist, Major

Program description and objectives

At the core of the branch of anthropology that focuses on society, culture and language is the question of how we humans organize our lives together, and why we do so in such vastly different ways. Studying society means studying social relations: relations between kin and neighbours, between genders and generations, between ethnic groups and nations, between rich and poor, between people and the natural environment that sustains them, and between people and their gods. These relations are both material and meaningful. When we study culture and language, we attempt to grasp the meaningful and communicative dimensions of social life – the ways in which we understand and act upon the world around us, drawing on our different historical memories, symbols and linguistic codes.

The Specialist and Major programs in Anthropology (Society, Culture, and Language) aim to provide students with an education in social cultural and linguistic anthropology that meets the highest academic standards and allows them to develop their capacities to think clearly and critically, take account of a wide range of perspectives, reach ethically sound decisions, and contribute constructively to society.

Curriculum and program delivery

The Anthropology Specialist and Major (Society, Culture, and Language) offer students a comprehensive introduction to anthropological approaches to studying society, culture, and language. Students begin by taking courses that introduce them to core concepts and to anthropological research on issues of importance in the world today. In their upper years, students take a core course focusing on anthropological theory. Specialists take additional courses in methods and the critical reading of ethnography, along with one of several area courses focusing on a particular region of the world. Both Majors and Specialists are also required to do 400-level courses involving independent research and analysis.

Program Requirements

Anthropology (Society, Culture and Language-Arts Program): Specialist

(10 full courses or their equivalent, including at least 2 FCE at the 400 level)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT207H1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First and/or Second Year

1. ANT204H1 and ANT207H1

Upper years

2. ANT370H1 and ANT380H1

3. 6 FCE from Group C including at least 0.5 FCE course from Subgroup C(i)

4. ANT475H1 and an additional 1.5 FCE at the 400-level

Note: Students who enrolled in the Specialist in Anthropology (Social/Cultural) in 2009-10 or 2010-11 and who did not take ANT210H1 are strongly encouraged to take ANT380H1, but may instead take an additional half course from Group C 

Anthropology (Society, Culture and Language-Arts Program): Major

(6.5 full courses or their equivalent including at least 2.0 FCE at the 300+ level and at least 1 FCE at the 400 level)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT100Y1 with a final mark of at least 67% or ANT207H1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First and/or Second Year

1. ANT207H1
2. ANT204H1 or ANT253H1

Upper years

3. ANT370H1 or ANT425H1
4. Five additional FCE from Group C including at least 1 FCE at the 400 level. Students who want to focus more specifically on the role of language in culture and society should take ANT253H1, ANT425H1, and courses in the C (ii) Subgroup 

Photo by Arthur Kwiatkowski
Photo by Arthur Kwiatkowski
Anthropology (Evolutionary-Science Program): Major

Program description and objectives

Evolutionary anthropology provides the opportunity to think deeply about the nature of humanity.

Human biology and behaviour are bio-cultural. Like other animals, genetics and environment influence their lives, but unlike other animals both of those factors are influenced by culture. As humans face problems of urban crowding, interpersonal conflict, and ill health, we can learn from the insights derived from evolutionary anthropology, viewing our species in the context of our origin and evolution. An understanding of the time line and the adaptations that brought us to this point in our natural history can form the basis for many careers that require an appreciation of human diversity as well as knowledge about human anatomy, behaviour and our species’ ecological context.

The Major in Evolutionary Anthropology aims to provide students with an education in evolutionary anthropology that meets the highest academic standards and allows them to develop their capacities to think clearly and critically, judge objectively, and contribute constructively to society. 

Curriculum and program delivery

The Anthropology Major (Evolutionary) begins with a core set of courses providing a foundation in biology in the first and second years of study. In the upper years, the Department of Anthropology offers courses in four areas: primate origins and ecology, palaeoanthropology, human variation, and human health. There are opportunities for advanced study and independent research projects, as well as field experience.

The sequence of required courses in the Anthropology Major (Evolutionary) is intended to provide students with increasing depth of comprehension of evolutionary anthropology as they proceed through the program. The first year required courses, BIO 120H and either ANT100Y or BIO 220H, provide a foundation for understanding human and primate evolution and adaptation. The required 200-level course, ANT 203Y, introduces students to the concepts, methodologies and research areas that are encompassed by the Major. Students then select at least two FCEs from a set of courses that focus on four main areas of research: primate origins and ecology, paleoanthropology, human variation, and human health. All of the third and fourth year courses introduce students to advanced scholarly research and scientific methodology in these fields. Most upper level courses require students to read and synthesize independently, and to convey their ideas in written form. All core 300-level courses and several other 300- and 400-level courses involve an integrative, inquiry-based activity. 

Program Requirements

Anthropology (Evoulutionary-Science Program) Major:

(7.5 full courses or their equivalent, including at least 2 FCE at the 300+ level, 0.5 FCE of which must be at the 400-level)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT100Y1 with a final mark of at least 67% or ANT203Y1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First Year and/or Second Year
1. BIO120H1
2. ANT100Y1 or BIO220H1. If BIO220H1 is taken, students must take an additional 0.5 FCE in ANT
3. ANT203Y1

Upper Years
4. 2.0 FCE from ANT208H1, ANT333Y1, ANT334H1, ANT335Y1, ANT336H1
5. 2.5 additional FCE from: Group B and/or ANT406H1, ANT415Y1, ARH312Y1
6. 0.5 FCE at the 400-level from Group B

Anthropology Groups

These groups fulfill requirements for the anthropology programs. top

Group A: (Archaeology)

ANT200Y1, ANT299Y1, ANT311Y1, ANT314H1, ANT315H1, ANT316H1, ANT317H1, ANT318H1, ANT319Y1, ANT320H1, ANT372H1, ANT390H1, ANT406H1, ANT407H1, ANT409H1, ANT410H1, ANT411H1, ANT412H1, ANT415Y1, ANT416H1, ANT419H1, ANT420H1, ANT491Y1/ANT491H1, ANT497Y1/ANT498H1/ANT499H1; ARH305H1, ARH306Y1, ARH309H1, ARH312Y1, ARH360H1, ARH361H1/ARH361Y1, ARH482H1, ARH494H1, ARH495H1; VIC225Y1

Group B: (Evolutionary)

ANT203Y1, ANT208H1, ANT299Y1, ANT330Y1, ANT333Y1, ANT334H1, ANT335Y1, ANT336H1, ANT338H1, ANT371H1, ANT390H1, ANT430H1, ANT432H1, ANT434H1, ANT435H1, ANT436H1, ANT438H1, ANT481H1, ANT491Y1/ANT491H1, ANT497Y1/ANT498H1/ANT499H1; HAJ453H1

Group C: (Society, Culture and Language)

ANT204H1, ANT207H1, ANT208H1, ANT299Y1, ANT322H1, ANT324H1, ANT343H1, ANT345H1, ANT346H1, ANT347Y1, ANT348H1, ANT349H1, ANT351H1, ANT356H1, ANT358H1ANT364H1, ANT366H1, ANT368H1, ANT369H1, ANT370H1, ANT371H1, ANT372H1ANT374H1, ANT376H1, ANT378H1, ANT380H1, ANT384H1, ANT390H1, ANT426H1, ANT435H1, ANT440H1, ANT441H1, ANT445H1, ANT447H1, ANT449H1, ANT450H1, ANT451H1, ANT452H1, ANT456H1, ANT457H1, ANT460H1, ANT462H1, ANT473H1, ANT474H1, ANT475H1, ANT476H1, ANT480H1, ANT484H1, ANT485H1, ANT486H1, ANT490Y1ANT491Y1/ANT491H1ANT497Y1/ANT498H1/ANT499H1; JAH391Y1/JAH391H1; JNH350H1; NEW250Y1 ; NMC356H1; VIC225Y1

Group C (i): (Society, Culture and Language – Area)

ANT327H1, ANT340H1, ANT341H1, ANT458H1, ANT468H1, ANT472H1, ANT477H1; NMC241H1; NEW316H1

Group C (ii): (Society, Culture and Language – Linguistic)

ANT253H1, ANT329H1, ANT425H1, ANT427H1, ANT483H1, ANT497Y1/ANT498H1/ANT499H1; JAL328H1, JAL353H1, JAL355H1, JAL401H1; SLA380H1

***ANT390H1 This course may be placed in either Group A or B or C depending on the topic which will vary from year to year.

Archaeology (Arts Program): Specialist, Major, Minor
Photo of Archaeology students participating in Prof. Edward Swenson's 2011 field school in Peru
Archaeology students participating in Prof. Edward Swenson’s 2011 field school in Peru

Program description and objectives

Archaeology is the study of past human societies based mainly on their material remains, or material culture. Archaeological research allows us to extend our understanding of history to include societies that existed many millennia before the advent of writing, as well as to societies and groups whose histories were never written down, or are known only partially.

Archaeologists explore continuity and change in past cultures around the world through field surveys, excavation of sites, and analyses of stone tools, pottery, bones, plant remains, architecture, and many other cultural residues. Some prominent fields of research are pursued almost exclusively through archaeology, such as research on the origins of agriculture and pastoralism, and on the origin of cities. But archaeologists also collect evidence about the lives of people and social groups who are misrepresented or not represented at all in conventional history, especially marginalized ethnic groups or classes. While some archaeologists focus on the prehistory of hunter-gatherers, others specialize in the study of politically complex societies.

Classical archaeologists, for example, specialize in the cultures of the ancient Greco-Roman world, and combine archaeological evidence with the rich textual sources that are available to them. Other archaeologists specialize in particular classes of evidence, such as paleoethnobotanists, who explore ways that botanical residues can inform us about ancient economies and social systems. Because archaeology is so diverse, and is pursued by faculty and students in several distinct departments, its curriculum is inherently interdisciplinary.

The Specialist, Major and Minor programs in Archaeology aim to provide students with an education in archaeology that meets the highest academic standards and allows them to develop their capacities to think clearly and critically, take account of a wide range of perspectives, make sound judgments, and contribute constructively to society.

The admission requirements aim to ensure students in the program are capable of acquiring a foundation in four-field anthropology or archaeology.

Curriculum and program delivery

The Archaeology Specialist program is a comprehensive program intended to give students the set of tools and breadth of background that they will require to pursue graduate studies in the field of archaeology or careers that involve understanding past civilizations and their material cultures. The program is designed to accommodate students with interests in diverse fields of specialization (e.g., Classical archaeology, Iroquoian archaeology and Palaeolithic archaeology).

In their first year, students take a foundational course in archaeology (ANT200Y) and one additional FCE selected from a variety of gateway courses in disciplines that underpin specialized fields of study in archaeology. Students in the Specialist also take a statistics course in preparation for subsequent courses that involve the analysis of quantitative archaeological data. In the upper years, students take core courses in archaeological theory, methods, and ethics.

Students in the Specialist also gain practical experience in lab and field settings. In the upper years, students also customize their program by choosing courses with specializations in particular research methodologies, cultural areas, or both.

Program Requirements

Archaeology (Arts Program) Specialist

(11 full courses or their equivalent, including at least 4 FCE at the 300+ level and 1 FCE at the 400 level)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT200Y1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First Year

1. ANT200Y1

2. Statistical Requirement: GGR270H1 (Geography pre- or co-requisites waived for Archaeology and Anthropology students); or 0.5 FCE from STA220H1, STA221H1, STA247H1, STA248H1, STA255H1, STA257H1, STA261H1, or ANTC35H3 (at UTSC)

3. ANT100Y1 or CLA160H1. If CLA160H is taken, students must take an additional 0.5 FCE from the following: CLA230H1, CLA231H1, CLA232H1, CLA233H1; FAH206H1, FAH207H1; GGR100H1, GGR101H1; NMC260H1, NMC262H1

Upper Years

4. ARH305H1, ARH309H1, ARH312Y1, ANT411H1

5. Field Requirement: ANT311Y1 or ARH306Y1 or NMC261Y0 or ARH361Y1 or ARH361H1 or ANT418H5 (at UTM). If ARH361H1 or ANT418H5 is taken, students must take an additional 0.5 FCE from ANT.

6. 5.0 FCE from Groups A and B, of which 2.0 FCE must be from Group A and 2.0 FCE must be from Group B and 1.0 FCE from either group

Note that students may substitute ARH495H1 (Research Practicum) for 0.5 FCE of this requirement (assignment to Group A or B to be determined by Undergraduate Coordinator).

Archaeology (Arts Program) Major

(7 full courses or their equivalent, including at least 2 FCE at the 300+ level and 0.5 FCE at the 400-level)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT100Y1 with a final mark of at least 67% or ANT200Y1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

First Year:

1. ANT200Y1
2. ANT100Y1 or CLA160H1. If CLA160H1 is taken, students must take an additional 0.5 FCE from the following: CLA230H1, CLA231H1, CLA232H1, CLA233H1; FAH206H1, FAH207H1; GGR100H1, GGR101H1; NMC260H1, NMC262H1

Upper Years

3. ARH305H1 and ARH309H1
4. 1 FCE from: ARH306Y1, ARH312Y1, ARH361Y1, ARH361H1, ANT311Y1, NMC261Y0, NMC369Y1, NMC465H1, NMC466H1
5. 2.5 FCE from: Group A
6. 0.5 FCE from: Group B

Archaeology (Arts Program) Minor

(4 full course equivalents, including at least 1 FCE at the 300- or 400-levels)

This is a limited enrolment program. All students who request the program and obtain at least the specified mark(s) in the required course(s) will be eligible to enrol.

Courses for admission: ANT200Y1 with a final mark of at least 70%.

1. ANT200Y1

2. ARH305H1 and ARH309H1

3. 1.5 FCE from Group A

4. 0.5 FCE from Group B

If ARH312Y is completed, it will be considered a Group A course.

Archaeology Groups (Note that these are different from the Anthropology ones)

The groups are divided in such a way as to give you guidance about which courses, in various departments, are relevant to different areas of archaeological specialization. Note that this does not mean that they are archaeology courses, per se.

These groups fulfill requirements for the archaeology programs. top

GROUP A: Theoretical and Methods

1- Theoretical: ANT370H1, ANT372H, ANT409H1, ANT410H1, ANT411H1, ANT416H1, ANT420H1; HIS425H; VIC225Y1

2- Archaeometry: CHM317H1, CHM414H1, CHM416H1; GGR337H1; JGA305H1; NMC369Y1

3- Ceramic and Lithic Analysis: ANT406H1; NMC369Y1, NMC462Y1, NMC465H1, NMC466H1, NMC469Y1

4- Geoarchaeology: ANT409H1; GGR272H1, GGR273H1, GGR301H1, GGR307H1, GGR337H1, GGR373H1, GGR390H1, GGR413H1; ESS330H1, ESS331H1; JGA305H1

5- Osteoarchaeology and Zooarchaeology: ANT334H1, ANT335Y1, ANT 338H1, ANT415Y1, ANT432H1, ANT434H1; EEB318H1, EEB323H1, EEB324H1

6- Paleoethnobotany: EEB330H1, EEB340H1; GGR305H1, GGR390H1; JGE331H1

7- Urbanism and Settlement: ANT 318H1

GROUP B: Area Courses and Cultural History

1- Classical and Aegean Archaeology: CLA230H1, CLA231H1, CLA232H1, CLA233H1, CLA362H1, CLA363H1, CLA364H1, CLA366H1, CLA367H1, CLA368H1, CLA369H1, CLA371H1, CLA389H1, CLA392H1, CLA403H1; FAH206H1, FAH207H1, FAH303H1, FAH309H1, FAH401H1, FAH407H1, FAH486H1; HIS320H1

2- Egyptian Archaeology: JAL328H1; NMC343H1, NMC344H1, NMC362Y1, NMC368H1, NMC382Y1, NMC461Y1, NMC467H1, NMC468H1

3- European and Celtic Archaeology:  FAH318H1, FAH327H1, FAH328H1, FAH420H1, FAH421H1; HIS321H1, HIS323H1, HIS336H1, HIS357Y1, HIS362H1, HIS403H1, HIS412Y1, HIS424H1, HIS432H1; SMC344Y1, SMC337H1, SMC338H1

4- Historical Archaeology: ANT412H1, FAH376H1; GGR240H1, GGR241H1, GGR336H1, GGR421H1; HIS369H1, HIS374H1, HIS384H1

5- Islamic Archaeology:  HIS303H1; NMC348Y1, NMC365Y1, NMC366Y1, NMC374H1, NMC376H1, NMC393H1, NMC394H1, NMC396Y1

 6- Near Eastern Archaeology: JAL328H1; NMC346H1, NMC347H1, NMC360H1, NMC361H1, NMC363H1, NMC364H1, NMC370H1, NMC461Y1, NMC466H1

 7- North and South American Prehistory: ANT314H1, ANT315H1, ANT316H1, ANT317H1, ANT319Y1, ANT320H1, ANT407H1; HIS369H1

8- Old World Prehistory: ANT419H1; ARH 360H1

9- East Asian Archaeology: EAS406Y1, EAS411H1, EAS412H1, EAS438H1

Undergraduate Collaborative Programs:

Dr. David Chu Programme in Asia-Pacific Studies, (Major, Minor)

Directed Minor Program in Environmental Anthropology (Arts Program)

Directed Minor in Environmental Anthropology (Arts Program)

School of the Environment

(4 full courses or their equivalent, must include at least one full course equivalent at the 300+ level)

1. ANT100Y1/(ENV221H1,ENV222H1/GGR222H1)/ENV222Y1/GGR222Y1

2. ANT200Y1/ (ANT204H1 + ANT207H1/0.5 300 level Social Anthropology course)

3. Two FCE’s from: ABS250H1, ABS402H1; ANT315H1, ANT336H1, ANT346H1, ANT351H1, ANT364H1, ANT366H1, ANT 368H1, ANT371H1ANT374H1, ANT376H1, ANT409H1, ANT410H1, ANT415Y1, ANT420H1, ANT430H1, ANT450H1

 

Please send suggestions or corrections to Josie Alaimo