2019-20 Anthropology Graduate Timetable

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Fall 2019- Graduate Anthropology September Session Classes begin: September 9, 2019

Monday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
 Campus
ANT 6100H F History of Anthropological Thought – SCL MA required  SCL 12pm – 3 pm AP 246 Hillewaert/Kilroy STG
ANT 6200H F Ethnographic Practicum SCL 4pm – 7pm AP 330 Li STG
ANT 4059H F Anthropological Understandings of Cultural Transmission ARCH 4pm – 6pm HSC 346 Xie UTM
ANT 4060H F Specific Problems I: Paleoethnobotany ARCH 2pm – 4pm HSC 356 Crawford UTM
ANT 3005H F Advanced Topics in Paleoanthropology EVO 2pm – 4pm AP 414 Begun STG

Tuesday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT6055H F Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood SCL 10am – 1pm AP 246 Napolitano/Daswani STG
ANT6031H F Research Seminar: Anthropology of Care SCL 1pm – 4pm AP 140 Taylor STG
ANT6059H F Anthropology and History SCL 2pm – 4pm AP 367 Kalmar STG
ANT6034H F Research Seminar: Anthropology of the Otherwise SCL 4pm – 7pm AP 246
AP 367 – Oct 1, Nov 5, Dec 3
Dave STG
ANT1096H F Quantitative Methods I EVO 2pm – 4pm AP 246 Schroeder STG
Dissertation Writing Seminar – Fall/Winter SCL 9am – 12pm

AP 102A

Sept 24
Oct 8, 29
Nov 12, 16
Dec 3

Muehlebach STG

Wednesday

 Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT6040H F Research Design and Fieldwork Methods SCL 10am- 12pm AP 367 Luong STG
ANT6019H F Anthropology of Neoliberalism SCL 12pm – 3pm AP 367 Song STG
ANT5144H F Foundations in linguistic anthropology SCL 3pm – 5pm AP 367 Sidnell STG
ANT3047H F Evolutionary Anthropology Theory (Core Course) EVO 2pm – 4pm AP 140 Dewar STG
ANT3031H F Advanced Research Seminar: Sleep and primate evolution: Theory, methods, and application EVO 10am – 12pm AP 140 Samson STG
ANT4044H F Inter-regional Interaction in the Ancient world – Fall ARCH 1pm – 4pm AP 102A Jennings STG

Thursday

Course
Title
Field
Time
 Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT6061H F Anthropology of Sexuality and Gender SCL 2pm – 5pm AP 367 Hartblay STG
ANT4041H F Landscape archaeology ARCH 10am – 12pm AP 367 Banning STG
ANT 6150H Y Proposal writing course (SCL PhD Core) – *Full year course, room/time different for S session* SCL 10am-1pm AP 246 Bozcali/Paz STG
Arch/Evo Dissertation Writing Seminar – Fall/Winter ARCH/EVO 2pm-4pm AP 246 Friesen STG

Winter 2020 – Graduate Anthropology January Session Classes Begin January 6, 2020

Monday

Course
Title
Field
Time
 Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT4065H S Specific Problems II: Archaeology and Climate Change ARCH 1pm – 3pm AP 140 Friesen STG
ANT6150H Y Proposal writing course (SCL PhD Core) – continued from Fall *Full year course, room/time different for F session* SCL 12pm – 3pm AP 367 Bozcali/Paz STG

Tuesday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
JSA5147H S Language, nationalism and post nationalism SCL 10am – 1pm AP 367 Heller STG
ANT6027H S Anthropology of Violence SCL 2pm – 4pm AP 367 Krupa STG
ANT4020H S ​Archaeology Theory (core course) ARCH 2pm – 5pm AP 140 Cipolla STG
Dissertation Writing Seminar – Fall/Winter SCL 9am -12pm

AP 102A

Sept 24
Oct 8, 29
Nov 12, 16
Dec 3

Muehlebach STG

Wednesday

Course
 Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT1099H S Quantitative Methods II EVO 12pm – 2pm AP 246 Schillaci STG
ANT7001H S Medical Anthropology SCL 10am – 12pm AP 367 Dahl STG
ANT6006H S ​Genealogies of Anthropological Thought SCL 2pm – 5pm AP 367 Sanders STG
ANT4066H S Household Archaeology ARCH 12pm – 2pm AP 140 Coupland STG
ANT4070H S Archaeologies of Place, Urbanism, and Infrastructures ARCH 2pm – 5pm AP 140 Swenson STG
ANT4030H S Artifacts ARCH 10am – 12pm AP 140 Chazan STG
ANT3034H S Advanced Research Seminar: Public Health Engagement with Indigenous Communities EVO 12pm – 2pm AP 367 Galloway STG

Thursday

Course
 Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT6014H S Media and Mediation SCL 10am – 12pm AP 367 Cody STG
ANT6017H S Post-colonial Science Studies and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge Translation​ SCL 12pm – 2pm AP 367 Satsuka STG
ANT6003H S Critical Issues in Ethnography SCL 2pm – 4pm AP 124 Lambek STG
ANT3032H S Advanced Research Seminar: People and Environments in Bioarchaeology EVO 2pm – 4pm AP 102A Cameron STG
ANT3439H S Advanced Seminar in Forensic Anthropology – Winter EVO 10am-1pm HSC 322 Rogers UTM
Arch/Evo Dissertation Writing Seminar (Fall/Winter() ARCH/EVO 2pm – 4pm AP 246 Friesen STG

Courses of Interest in Other Departments

Course
Title
Field
Day/Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
RLG3290 Words and Worship Religion Wednesdays 10am-12pm JHB317 Coleman STG
* CORE COURSE – see 2019 – 2020 Anthropology Graduate Handbook for program specific course requirements 

ANT 1096H F – Quantitative Methods I (Schroeder) (return to timetable)

This course will provide students with the basic analytic background necessary to evaluate quantitative data in biological anthropology and archaeology. Students will be introduced to foundational statistical concepts and research methods suitable for anthropological exploration. The focus will be on analysing univariate and bivariate data using both nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques, hypothesis testing, and methods of data collection. The goal of this course is for students to learn how to manipulate simple datasets, ask and answer theoretically relevant questions, and choose the appropriate statistical test for a given research problem. Students will have access to a number of biological anthropology and archaeology datasets for class assignments. No prior knowledge of statistics and mathematics is required.

ANT 1099H S – Quantitative Methods II (Schillaci) (return to timetable)

This course will cover many of the multivariate statistical methods used by biological anthropologists and archaeologists such as principal components analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis including formal classification and canonical variate analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and cluster analysis.

ANT 3005H F – Advanced Topics in Paleoanthropology (Begun) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 3031H F – ADV Research Seminar: Sleep and primate evolution: Theory, methods, and application (D. Samson) (return to timetable)

This course examines our current understanding of primate sleep ecology and function, with a particular focus on how these elements drove the evolution of human sleep. The goal of the course is to provide students the prerequisite theoretical foundation and working knowledge of innovative methods (measuring the spectrum of behaviors on the inactive-active continuum) to propose informed, hypothesis driven research projects in their own area of interest.

ANT3032H S – Advanced Research Seminar: People and Environments in Bioarchaeology (Cameron) (return to timetable)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of how researchers may use bioarchaeological information to interrogate how past human groups interacted with diverse environmental conditions. This course will focus on the Holocene and will examine methods used to examine past human-environment interactions. This course will also explore diverse theoretical perspectives, case studies from globally distributed groups, and newly emerging lines of research.

ANT 3034H S – Advanced Research Seminar: Public Health Engagement with Indigenous Communities (Galloway) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 3047H F – Evolutionary Anthropology Theory (core course) (Dewar) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 3439H S – Advanced Seminar in Forensic Anthropology – Winter (Rogers) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 4020H S – Archaeology Theory (core course) (Cipolla) (return to timetable)

This seminar offers an in-depth examination of the history of archaeological theory and the major theoretical approaches defining the discipline today. Students explore competing schools of archaeological thought concerned with the study of material culture, past social formations, and historical process. From functionalist and natural science-focused positions to poststructural and postmodern inquiries into meaning, representation, and politics to more recent archaeological attempts to de-center humans in hopes of liberating things, this seminar covers a diverse set of perspectives. Emphasis is placed on how shifting positions on human nature, social organization, alterity, gender, and power directly shape archaeological reconstructions and representations of the past. Ultimately, the seminar should provide students with a rich understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underpin contemporary archaeological research and the unique problems inherent in archaeological efforts to represent and interpret the material record.

ANT 4041H F – Landscape archaeology (Banning) (return to timetable)

This course will serve as an introduction and critical examination of the diversity of archaeological approaches to landscapes, with some historical perspective from early “field archaeology” and Crawford’s aerial archaeology, through economic-geographical approaches to settlement, exchange and land-use systems, to archaeological survey, place, wayfaring, phenomenology, and Ingold’s “dwelling” perspective.

*To Receive UTM shuttle tickets: When at UTM, please stop in to HSC304 in order to pick-up the shuttle bus tickets from Joanna. They will typically provide 10-20 tickets at a time and will ask students to sign for them.

ANT 4044H F – Inter-regional Interaction in the Ancient world – Fall (Jennings) (return to timetable)

Since at least the Lower Paleolithic Period, interregional interaction has been fundamental to the development of cultures from around the world.  The movement of ideas, people, and objects across vast areas is not confined to the modern era, and in this course we will explore the role that interregional interaction has played in many of the most important processes in human history from the dispersal of Homo Erectus, the beginnings of social inequality, the origins of agriculture, the birth of cities, and the spread of civilizations. The course is run as a discussion seminar and readings for the course will consist largely of case studies from around the world and across time.  The major requirement for the course is a 20-25 page research paper that explores how changes in interregional interaction changed society in one particular region of the world (50% of grade).  Students will also submit a reading report for of the weeks in the course. The one page, single spaced report will distill the critical elements of each reading and link them to the broader themes of the course (30% of grade). Each student will also be responsible for organizing discussion questions for one day of class (10%), as well as for regular participation and attendance (10%). All readings are posted on the course page in the university’s Quercus site (access Quercus via the UT website).

ANT 4059 F – Anthropological Understandings of Cultural Transmission (Xie) (return to timetable)

Cultural transmission (CT) is the reproduction of information and practices in the forms of ideas, behaviours, and/or materials through social learning among intra-generational individuals, between societies, and from one generation to the next. Therefore, CT is fundamental to human experience. The topic of CT has received increasing interest in many disciplines, such as biology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and education. Anthropologists in all subfields are well-equipped with rich data to contribute to methodological and theoretical building in this field.

The exact contents of this course are tailored to the interest and needs of the students enrolled, thus vary from year to year. Whenever possible, we use case studies from multiple disciplines to help students develop a better understanding of the biological, cognitive, and social foundations for the diversity, continuity and changes in our cultures over generations.

*To Receive UTM shuttle tickets: When at UTM, please stop in to HSC304 in order to pick-up the shuttle bus tickets from Joanna. They will typically provide 10-20 tickets at a time and will ask students to sign for them.

ANT 4060H F – Specific Problems I: Paleoethnobotany – Fall (Crawford) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 4065H S – Specific Problems II: Archaeology and Climate Change (Friesen) (return to timetable)

Evidence from the natural sciences for past and present climate change is overwhelming. However, its deployment as an explanatory framework in archaeology is inconsistent – on the one hand, climate change must have had profound impacts on many past human societies; but on the other, archaeologists are justifiably wary of automatically pinning changes in past lifeways on external environmental forces, rather than seeking “internal” political, social, and ideological explanations.  Currently, archaeological investigations of climate change impacts are experiencing a surge of interest, at least in part because of the prominence of modern climate change in public political, social, and economic discourse.  As a global community, we are worried about it!  Many major past phenomena, from hunter-gatherer migrations through agricultural origins to the rise and demise of state-level societies have been hypothesized to result, often quite directly, from changing climates (though of course other explanations also exist).  At the same time, climate change archaeology is becoming increasingly sophisticated, particularly in terms of understanding the mechanisms through which aspects of climate/weather and human lifeways are intertwined.  To begin to come to grips with these issues, this survey course will cover: 1) general approaches to studying climate change in relation to past human lifeways; 2) case studies in which climate change is hypothesized to have had direct impacts on past societies; 3) the impacts of modern climate change on the archaeological record; and 4) the relationship of archaeology as a discipline to broader considerations of current and future climate change

ANT 4066H S – Household Archaeology (Coupland) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 4070H S – Archaeologies of Place, Urbanism, and Infrastructures (Swenson) (return to timetable)

This seminar offers a critical review of archaeological approaches to place, space, landscapes, cities, and infrastructures in comparative perspective.  In our post-industrial world, the second circuit of capital (real-estate speculation and public works) increasingly dominates political discourse. Archaeological research demonstrates that political economies grounded in the construction of place is not a modern phenomenon but has defined hierarchical polities ever since their inception.  In this course, students will examine the emergence and organization of ancient cities and pre-industrial infrastructure projects through a detailed investigation of social theory on space and the urban condition.  We will explore competing interpretations of urban process and examine how physical infrastructures shaped the political institutions, economies, and ideologies of cities past and present.  Students will have the opportunity to consider a broad range of subjects, including mechanisms of city genesis; urban-rural relations; the intersections of city and state; infrastructures and the politics of place-making; and historical variation in urban landscapes, worldviews, and political economies.  Discussion will focus in part on the spatial practices, social inequalities, and political institutions linking ancient urbanism with industrial and post-industrial cities.  In turn, an examination of competing theories on capitalist and “postmodern” urbanism is intended to advance our understanding of the distinctive socioeconomic characteristics of pre-modern complex polities.

ANT 5144 F – Foundations in linguistic anthropology (Sidnell) (return to timetable)

This course offers an introduction to contemporary linguistic anthropology by means of a survey of some dissertations and ethnographic monographs. This year the focus will be on Southeast Asia. In our reading of each book or dissertation we will consider their theoretical foundations, analytic goals and methodological orientations thereby tracking alternative approaches to foundational questions and, at the same time, mapping some key intellectual genealogies of the field. The idea is to provide a survey of contemporary work and an overview of disciplinary foundations while at the same time providing an opportunity to read some dissertations and ethnographies that might inspire students in their own PhD research.       

ANT 6003H S – Critical Issues in Ethnography (Lambek) (return to timetable)

Ethnography is at once a mode of research practice, a genre of writing, and a kind of knowledge.  In this course we examine a series of ethnographic works, distinguished according to the time of writing, the places written about, and the theoretical preoccupations and positionality of the authors in order to discuss some of the central issues that arise in thinking anthropologically and the nature of the field as it has changed over time. Readings include a mix of classic and more or less contemporary works that together highlight the richness and diversity of the field. We will be concerned with the content and its relation to theoretical models, authorial positioning and voice, narrative style, characterization, representation, and reflexivity, all the while attending to the means by which ethnography is conceived and produced in its historical and intellectual context. Cultivating a mode of reading ethnography provides a necessary path to writing it.

ANT 6006H S – Genealogies of Anthropological Thought (Sanders) (return to timetable)

This advanced seminar aims to equip students with a partial intellectual history of sociocultural anthropology. Such courses are often structured chronologically, moving from classical to contemporary social and anthropological theory (e.g., ANT6100). This course instead assumes a familiarity with the theoretical canons, their critiques and historical emergence, and attends to particular foundational questions and epistemological concerns that have long preoccupied anthropologists. Thus, each week serves as a minor genealogy of anthropological thought. Through the seminar students should come to appreciate not only the varied theoretical positions and projects that have animated anthropology at specific sociohistorical moments, but also the recursive nature of anthropological theorising itself – the many ways that old questions are continually being revisited, revised and reanimated through new lexicons and lenses.

ANT 6014H S – Media and Mediation (Cody) (return to timetable)

This reading-intensive seminar focuses on ethnographic approaches to the process of mass mediation, with specific reference to critical theories of semiotics.  The course combines “classic” theoretical texts drawn from a range of disciplines with more empirical accounts of how communicative processes are integral to large-scale social formations, and how such processes influence our current understanding of mass politics, publicity, social movements, “big data,” racialization, warfare, digitalization, migrant diasporas, and the possibility of a global subject.  Placing our understanding of media technologies within the more encompassing concept of mediation, this course asks what ethnographic accounts can offer to the interdisciplinary field of media studies.

ANT 6017H S – Post-colonial Science Studies and the Cultural Politics of Knowledge Translation​ (Satsuka) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 6019H F – Anthropology of Neoliberalism (Song) (return to timetable)

For the year of 2019-20, this seminar course explores the concept of fetishism as a vantage point for instigating the genealogies of western epistemologies and ontologies that have influenced premises (and criticisms) of prevalent binaries in contemporary academia: ex. subject and object; material and immaterial; political economic and ideological/discursive. Fetishism was not only invented to objectify the non-western “Other,” in the debates of western colonialist, theologians and Enlightenment scholars. It has also been deployed as a tool for critiquing industrial capitalism in Marxist and (post)modern desire in psychoanalysis and cultural studies. Moreover, it is summonedin conjunction with post-humanist frameworks of object-oriented ontology. It is a revealing lens that enables the historicization of critical approaches that attend to both the current and classic literature.

ANT 6027H S – Anthropology of Violence (Krupa) (return to timetable)

This course examines anthropological approaches to the study of violence. Violence has long been a central focus for anthropological research. One of the overarching ambitions in much of this research has been to make violence meaningful in some respect. Violence can be given meaning in any number of ways. For example, it can be analyzed as being part of a system of exchange, a system of sacrifice, a system of debt, a system of law-making, or a system of signs. More recently, however, studies of violence have started to emphasize the importance of failures in meaning. In this regard, it could be argued that violence describes the limits of the human capacity to give meaning to events.
This course provides an overview of anthropological and related theories of violence. Some of the central theorists considered in the course are Benjamin, Arendt, Derrida, Foucault, and Agamben. The course then situates these theories within the context of ethnographic cases. The varieties of violence considered in these ethnographies range from forms of violence normally associated with small-scale societies (circumcision, tribal warfare, headhunting, witchcraft killings, etc.) to the forms of violence perpetrated by modern states and their citizens (modern warfare, torture, incarceration, rape, police violence, vigilantism, etc.)

ANT 6031H F – Research Seminar: Anthropology of Care (Taylor) (return to timetable)

This course offers an extended exploration of “care” as the concept has been taken up in contemporary medical anthropology. Our purpose is to gain a broad understanding of the terrain of scholarly debates surrounding this concept, the better to formulate and articulate our own views. 

What does “care” mean, how is it organized, and what does it look like in different contexts? Where does caring happen? Who is involved in the work of care? Who or what counts as deserving of care, and who or what may be left out, forgotten, or simply abandoned? How is care defined in relation to its opposites: cure, choice, obligation, indifference? How do politics shape care, and what might it mean to say that care is political?

While exploring what ethnographic studies can reveal about care as a domain of social life, we shall also remain alert to conceptual and methodological differences that are revealed by this focus on care. We shall ask, as well, how care is (or could / should be) entailed in and enacted through our own scholarly practices of research, collegial interaction, teaching, and writing.

ANT 6033H S – Research Seminar: Unsettling Settler Colonialism – Winter (Pending) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 6034H F – Research Seminar: Anthropology of the Otherwise (Dave) (return to timetable)

Another title for this course could be Anthropology of the Possible. Taking a concept popularized by Elizabeth Povinelli (2011), this seminar on the anthropology of the otherwise examines the world as it is, as it is becoming, and might also be. The course combines anthropology, philosophy, and literature to theorize ecological catastrophe, dreams and dreamworlds, art and creativity, and the fashioning of political and moral alternatives to the world as it. Key interlocutors include Alain Badiou, Gernot Bohme, Gilles Deleuze, Eduord Glissant, Donna Haraway, Quentin Meillassoux, Povinelli, Michel Serres, and Sylvia Wynter.

ANT 6040H F – Research Design and Fieldwork Methods (Luong) (return to timetable)

This course is designed for graduate students in sociocultural and linguistic anthropology who plan to write their research proposals and to design their field projects in the near future.  It will examine different kinds of fieldwork design and data collection techniques.

ANT6055H F -Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood (Napolitano/Daswani) (return to timetable)

Personhood, subjectivity and human nature lie at the heart of anthropological inquiry: the meaning and relationship of self and other; how representations of human nature have developed and have shaped an imagination of a (Western) anthropos; the tensions between universality, singularity and the multitude; the exchange between humans and non-humans.

This course addresses the place of personhood and subjectivity through debates around themes such as the “Religious Subject”, the “Precarious Subject” and “Beyond-the-Subject”. The goal of the course is to introduce students to theoretical frameworks that have effectively been employed by anthropologists and critical theorists when studying personhood, subjectification and human nature, and also to think them through themes such as colonialism and post-colonialism. This course will be run as a seminar with evaluation based on participation, one oral presentation, weekly reports, and a final paper.

ANT 6059H F – Anthropology and History (Kalmar) (return to timetable)

In recent decades, anthropologists have become self-reflexive about the role that history has always played in anthropology, and on how anthropologists have contributed to what is considered History both in and outside academia. Anthropological methods, especially ethnography, have become of particular interest in this context, to both anthropologists and historians. The topic of the course fits into the broader problematic of the constructedness of History. We examine historical constructions by anthropologists and others of time and, relatedly, of such concepts as “race” and “religion.” We conclude by applying what we have learned to ongoing historical processes in our time. In 2019-20, this means examining the unfolding history of twenty-first century capitalism and the ongoing crisis of liberal democracy.

ANT 6061H F – Anthropology of Sexuality and Gender (Hartblay) (return to timetable)

This graduate research seminar explores the core genealogies of feminist anthropology and anthropology of sexuality, with a focus on how scholarly conversations which emerged in 20th century anglophone sociocultural anthropology reverberate in the discipline today. We will examine the theoretical and methodological innovations that scholars enacted in the shift from “women anthropologists” to an “anthropology of women” to feminist and transfeminist ethnography. In doing so, we will ask: How has the field as a whole responded to feminist critiques of knowledge production? Moreover, how has anthropology contributed to the emergence of today’s robust, transnational gender and sexuality studies? What is an anthropological approach to gender and sexuality? How ought anthropologists reconcile the prescriptivism of gender and sexual identity politics with the descriptivism of the ethnographic project? How does the anthropological perspective challenge assumptions about human gender and sexuality across culture and over time? What theoretical underpinnings hold together the core logics of the anthropological approach to gender and sexuality? Throughout, we will problematize normative cultural paradigms of: biological sex, social gender, and sexual attraction; kinship & marriage; masculine and feminine divisions of labor; and sexuality and gender in racializing and colonizing projects. Texts include works by scholars such as: Gayle Rubin, Ruth Benedict, Margaret Mead, Levi-Strauss, Marjorie Shostak, Margery Wolf, Ellen Lewin, Esther Newton, Evelyn Blackwood, Marilyn Strathern, Ara Wilson, Tom Boellstorff, Kamala Visweswaran, Elizabeth Povinelli, Khiara M. Bridges, Sasha Su-Ling Welland, Ryan R. Thoreson, Bobby Benedicto, Tiantian Zheng, and others. While the focus of this course is on sociocultural anthropology, the course is appropriate for graduate students from across the discipline, and students are invited to integrate related scholarly conversations in archaeology and biological anthropology into discussions and coursework.

ANT 6100H F – History of Anthropological Thought – SCL MA required (Hillewaert/Kilroy) (return to timetable)

As an introduction to the history of anthrological thought, this MA-level core course aims to familiarize students with the key thinkers, theoretical approaches, and ethnographic innovations that shaped the discipline between the late 1800’s and the 1980’s.  It likewise considers the kinds of knowledge, ethics, and modes of both representation and analysis these different approaches approaches have demanded.  An understanding of the historically situated character of our discipline is a crucial component of our contemporary practice, and this includes taking seriously the intellectual genealogies out of which–and often against which—contemporary thought has emerged.

ANT 6150H Y – Proposing Ethnographic Research (SCL PhD Core) (Bozcali/Paz) (return to timetable)

This seminar aims to assist doctoral students to develop thesis and research grant proposals. Throughout the seminar, the participants will be guided step by step to produce effective proposals for anthropological fieldwork. The seminar is designed as an intensive writing workshop that is based on timely sharing of work and peer-discussion. Run in workshop style, the seminar will help participants to develop skills of giving and receiving constructive comments on each other’s writing.

ANT 6200H F – Ethnographic Practicum (Li) (return to timetable)

Participants in this class conduct an independent ethnographic inquiry, analyse data, write it up and publish it on the Ethnography Lab website as an original contribution to knowledge. The premise of the class is that the most effective way to learn how to do ethnographic research is by actually doing it, with guidance and plenty of opportunity for feedback. The format of the class is collaborative. Each year the class has a common theme. All students identify a research site related to the theme, usually a site within the University of Toronto where they will conduct primary ethnographic research, and bring issues of research design, ethics, theory and analysis to the weekly group session for collective brainstorming. Assignments include individual weekly blog posts, collective synthesis and writing for the website, and an individual final report.

The theme for Fall 2019 is time. How do different temporalities shape the life of the university? How do faculty, staff and students make time, spend time, and value time, past, present and future?   Who tries to manage time, guiding people towards an optimal balance of study, exercise, leisure, and social interaction?  How do near-time management techniques fit with other temporalities e.g social media with its FOMO pressures, instrumental time (time is money), or the future-orientation that frames students’ time at university as merely a step towards employment?  Ethnographic research sites for this project may include offices, classrooms, locker rooms, dorms, clubs, unions, cafeterias, and social media platforms.  Don’t worry if you don’t have a topic or site in mind at the outset. Bring your half-baked ideas to the first class, and we’ll brainstorm collectively to turn them into something interesting, researchable, and well worth 12 weeks of your time. Check out the Ethnography Lab website to see student work and be inspired! https://ethnographylab.ca/category/ethnography-of-the-university/

ANT 7001H S – Medical Anthropology I​: Lively Matters: Inquiries into Science, Medicine, and the Body (Dahl) (return to timetable)

TBA

JSA5147H S – Language, nationalism and post nationalism (Heller) (return to timetable)

The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between ideologies and practices of language and nation, from the period of the rise of the nation-State in the 19th century to current social changes related to the globalized new economy which challenge prevailing ideas about language and nation. We will focus in particular on language as a technique of regimentation, which helps produce and police populations; and as a terrain of struggleover access to and legitimation of relations of authority, power and inequality. We will examine European nationalism and its ties to colonialism, industrial capitalism, liberal democracy and modernity. We will then move to reactions to it in the form of linguistic minority movements, international auxiliary languages, fascism (in particular Nazism), and Communism. We will then touch briefly on the post WWII period, and focus the rest of the course on contemporary conditions of late capitalism, since the late 1980s, with a focus on the commodification of language and identity in the current economy; language and globalization; and current debates on the ecology of language and language endangerment.  Throughout we will also examine the role of linguists, anthropologists and other producers of discourse about language, nation and State in the construction of theories of nation, ethnicity, race and citizenship.

RLG3290 – Words and Worship (Coleman) (return to timetable)

How are we to analyze the words that Christians use? And how are such words related to ritual forms? We explore techniques for the analysis of texts, while looking at forms of verbal discourse ranging from prayers, speaking in tongues, and citing the Bible to more informal narratives. For further information please visit: https://religion.utoronto.ca/courses/graduate/