2018-19 Anthropology Graduate Timetable

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Fall 2018- Graduate Anthropology September Session Classes begin September 10, 2018

Monday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
 Campus
ANT 6100H F History of Anthropological Thought – SCL MA required  SCL 12-3pm AP 246 Hillewaert/Kilroy STG
ANT 4020H F ​Archaeology Theory (core course)  ARCH 2-5pm AP 367 Cipolla STG
ANT 3005H F Advanced Topics in Paleoanthropology  EVO 2-4pm AP 414 Begun STG

Tuesday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Location
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6040H F Research Design and Fieldwork Methods  SCL 10am – 12pm AP 367 Luong STG
ANT 6027H F Anthropology of Violence  SCL  1-3pm AP 367  Krupa  STG
ANT 6150H Y Proposing Ethnographic Research (SCL PhD Core – 2nd year)  SCL  3-5pm AP 367 Bozcali  STG
ANT 6059H F Anthropology and History SCL 5 – 7 pm AP 367 Kalmar STG
ANT 4042H F ​Archaeology of Complex Hunter-Gatherers ARCH 2-4pm AP 140 Coupland STG
ANT 3050H F Species concepts and human evolution EVO 10am-12pm AP 362 Viola STG
ANT 3031H F ADV Research Seminar: Sleep and primate evolution: Theory, methods, and application EVO 12-2pm AP 140 D. Samson STG
ANT 3049H F Advanced Seminar in Evolutionary Morphology EVO 2-4pm AP 362 Schroeder STG

Wednesday

 Course
Title
Field
Time
Location
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6003H F Critical Issues in Ethnography SCL 10am-1pm AP 246 J. Boddy STG
ANT 6060H F Anthropology and Indigenous Studies in North America SCL 1-4pm AP 367 K. Maxwell STG
ANT 6032H F Advanced Research Seminar: Disability Anthropology SCL 4-6pm AP 367 C. Hartblay STG
ANT 4039H F Origin and Nature of Food Producing Societies​ ARCH 11am-1pm tba Crawford UTM
ANT 4025H F Archaeology of Eastern North America ARCH 1-4pm tba Smith UTM

Thursday

Course
Title
Field
Time
 Location
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6014H F Media and Mediation SCL 12-3pm AP 367 Cody/Paz STG
ANT 6200H F Ethnographic Practicum SCL 3-6pm AP 330 Li STG
Dissertation Writing Seminar SCL 12-3pm AP 102A Muehlebach STG

Winter 2019 – Graduate Anthropology January Session Classes Begin January 7, 2019

Monday

Course
Title
Field
Time
 Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6055H S Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood SCL 12-2pm AP 124 Napolitano STG
ANT 4065H S Specific Problems II – Paleolithic Archaeology ARCH 2-4pm AP 367 G. Dewar STG

Tuesday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT 5150H S Nation, State, and Language in Francophone Canada SCL 10am-12pm AP 367 Heller STG
ANT 7001H S Medical Anthropology I​: Lively Matters: Inquiries into Science, Medicine, and the Body SCL 1-3pm AP 367 Bright STG
ANT 7002H S Medical Anthroplogy II – Applied Biocultural Perspectives on Global Child Health EVO 11am-1pm AP 362 Sellen STG
ANT 6150H Y Proposing Ethnographic Research – continued from FALL session (SCL PhD Core – 2nd year) SCL 3-5pm AP 367 Bozcali STG

Wednesday

Course
 Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6031H S Research Seminar: Infrastructures SCL 10am-12pm AP 246 W. Butt STG
ANT 6006H S Genealogies of Anthropological Thought (SCL PhD 1st year) SCL 2-5pm AP 367 Sanders STG
ANT 3041H S Evolutionary Perspectives on Growth and Development EVO 10am-12pm AP 367 Schillaci STG
ANT 3010H S Human Osteology: Theory and Practice EVO 4-7pm AP 130 M. Cameron STG
ANT 6033H S Research Seminar: Unsettling Settler Colonialism SCL 4-6pm AP 246 McElhinny STG
ANT 4060H S Specific Problems I: Interregional Interactions ARCH 1-4pm AP 140 Jennings STG

Thursday

Course
 Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6029H S ​Anthropology of Capitalism SCL 10am – 12pm AP 367 Satsuka STG
ANT 3047H S Evolutionary Anthropology Theory (core course) EVO 4-6pm AP 246 M. Silcox STG
ANT 3048H S Primatological Theory and Methods EVO 12-2pm AP 367 J. Teichroeb STG
Dissertation Writing Seminar SCL 12-3pm AP 102A Muehlebach STG

Pending

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
TBA ARCH 2-4pm (Mon.) AP 367 Dewar STG

Courses of Interest in Other Departments

Course
Title
Field
Day/Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
MAC 1000Y Methods in Mediterranean archaeology ARCH Tues. 9am-12pm AP 140 Knappet/Murray STG
FAH 2023H S Mind and Materiality: Views from Art History and Archaeology ARCH Wed. 10am-1pm tba Knappet STG
MSL 2360H S Musuems and Indigenous Communities – for information please contact Cara Krmpotich – cara.krmpotich@utoronto.ca ARCH Wed. 6:30pm-9:30pm tba tba STG
* CORE COURSE – see 2018 – 2019 Anthropology Graduate Handbook for program specific course requirements 

 

ANT 3005H F – Advanced Topics in Paleoanthropology (D. Begun) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 3010H S – Human Osteology: Theory and Practice (M. Cameron) (return to timetable)

This course is directed towards people who already have some knowledge of human osteology and will provide a comprehensive overview of how researchers analyze human skeletal remains. The methods and tools used to study human skeletal remains will be critically examined through hands-on experiences, and the ethical implications of such research will be discussed in depth. This course will explore diverse theoretical challenges in the field, as well as the limitations and advantages of newly emerging lines of research.

ANT 3031H F – ADV Research Seminar: Sleep and primate evolution: Theory, methods, and application (D. Samson) (return to timetable)

This course examines our current understanding of primate sleep ecology and function, with a particular focus on how these elements drove the evolution of human sleep. The goal of the course is to provide students the prerequisite theoretical foundation and working knowledge of innovative methods (measuring the spectrum of behaviors on the inactive-active continuum) to propose informed, hypothesis driven research projects in their own area of interest.

ANT 3041H S – Evolutionary Perspectives on Growth and Development (M. Schillaci) (return to timetable)

How are human skeletal and dental remains used to address questions about the identity of individuals, life in antiquity and the evolution of the human species? What limitations and possibilities exist with this type of research? In what new directions is the field moving? The intended goal of this course is to provide you with advanced training in methodological and theoretical approaches in human osteology.

ANT 3047H S – Evolutionary Anthropology Theory (core course) (M.Silcox) (return to timetable)

The course is an intensive exploration of the ideas that form the foundation and leading concepts in evolutionary anthropology; historically important readings and current concepts will be presented and discussed in the context of research, including areas of population biology, evolution of our lineage, broadly framed.

ANT 3048H S – Primatological Theory and Methods (J. Teichroeb) (return to timetable)

In this course, we will take a historical perspective and examine major changes and advancements in theory in primatology. We will critically review some seminal theoretical works and the research of important scholars in the field. We will focus on how the social movements and gender biases of the time shaped the disciplines of primatology and biological anthropology. We will then move on to cover current issues and important theories in primatology. Given the breadth of the field, topics may include ecology, population biology, social behavior, cognition, genetics, and conservation. Students will present and discuss articles at weekly meetings, with a strong focus on class participation, and a final paper will be required.

ANT 3049H F – Advanced Seminar in Evolutionary Morphology (L. Schroeder) (return to timetable)

Building on the theory introduced in the Evolutionary Anthropology Core Course, this advanced seminar will provide students with a critical understanding of evolutionary biology and its fundamental concepts. The focus will be on evolutionary morphology, an aspect of evolutionary biology that addresses the “how” and “why” of morphology; the evolutionary processes that shape morphological variability and the effects of these at multiple levels of organismal biology. This course will also emphasize the application of quantitative genetic techniques and theory to studies in biological anthropology. In addition, the concepts of integration, evolvability and modularity will be discussed in an evolutionary developmental context. The ultimate goal of this course is to provide students with the foundational knowledge of the key concepts of evolutionary biology, cultivate critical evaluation skills, and provide the theoretical background for independent research project development in evolutionary morphology.

ANT 3050H F – Species concepts and human evolution (B. Viola) (return to timetable)

In this course we will survey the state-of-the-art in paleoanthropology, concentrating on recent changes to how we see species. In the last years, the old question of how to define species surfaced again, in part due to the recognition that gene flow is frequent between different recent, but also fossil primate species.

Students will be responsible for presenting a short lecture on a taxon, time period or event where the question of species concepts has been discussed recently and will direct the discussion of publications that they will assign. Students will also prepare an abstract and a meetings style presentation on a topic to be determined in consultation with the instructor.

ANT 4020H F – Archaeology Theory (core course) (C. Cipolla) (return to timetable)

This seminar offers an in-depth examination of the history of archaeological theory and the major theoretical approaches defining the discipline today. Students explore competing schools of archaeological thought concerned with the study of material culture, past social formations, and historical process. From functionalist and natural science-focused positions to post-structural and postmodern inquiries into meaning, representation, and politics, to more recent archaeological attempts to de-center humans in hopes of liberating things, this seminar covers a diverse set of perspectives. Emphasis is placed on how shifting positions on human nature, social organization, alterity, gender, and power directly shape archaeological reconstructions and representations of the past. Ultimately, the seminar should provide students with a rich understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underpin contemporary archaeological research and the unique problems inherent in archaeological efforts to represent and interpret the material record.

ANT 4025H F – Archaeology of Eastern North America (D. Smith) (return to timetable)

The Eastern Woodlands area of North America was the setting for distinctive cultural developments during the time period from c. 12,000 years ago until European contact 400 to 500 years ago. This course will examine these developments through application of the principles of scientific archaeology, using the Great Lakes region and southern Ontario as specific examples. Topics covered will include earliest inhabitants, hunter-gatherer-fisher lifeways, the origins of food production, development of village-dwelling tribal communities, and first contact with Europeans.

The course will follow a seminar format, where the class will meet to discuss a particular topic. For each of these meetings, a team of students will be responsible for researching the topic in some detail and presenting a summary, while the rest of the class will be responsible for preparing questions for discussion. Each student will also submit a 1-2 page summary of each week’s discussion. In addition, each student will prepare one research paper for submission.  The paper will require the student to formulate a major topic for detailed investigation, write a paper on the research, and present the results to the class.

ANT 4039H F – Origin and Nature of Food Producing Societies​ (G. Crawford) (return to timetable)

The course will focus on evaluating the concept of “agricultural origins” by considering plant and animal domestication as well as resource management in a broad range of contexts. We will explore issues surrounding “domestication” to see how it informs current thinking about agricultural beginnings. Case studies will come from Prof. Crawford’s research in East Asia and Eastern North America as well as from research by his colleagues who are investigating early agriculture throughout the world. We will be contacting a few of these specialists in order to discuss their recent research with them. The course assumes that you have an undergraduate background in the fundamentals of agricultural origins so our exploration of theoretical concepts will go beyond the well-worn and frustrating discussions of single causes. Instead discussion will focus on human ecology (niche construction, behavioural ecology, etc.). Specific interests of the class will be examined if appropriate.

ANT 4042H F – Archaeology of Complex Hunter-Gatherers (G. Coupland) (return to timetable)

Complex hunter-gatherers challenge traditional anthropological theory concerning the importance of agriculture to the emergence of cultural complexity.  Complex hunter-gatherers – those societies with high population densities, sedentary settlement, developing political economies, and most importantly, pronounced social inequality – have been recorded ethnographically in a few areas of the world, particularly in the Pacific Northwest, but were otherwise thought to have been rare and anomalous.  Recent archaeological studies show, however, that complex hunter-gatherers may have been much more common in the more distant past.  In this course we will consider the meaning of complexity, look at the factors that are prerequisite to complexity among hunter-gatherers, and examine the ways in which complexity is maintained in hunting and gathering societies.  We will also look at how archaeologists recognize evidence of complexity in the archaeological record.  Finally, we will examine several case studies (in the form of student presentations) of complex hunter-gatherers from around the world.

ANT 4060H S – Specific Problems I: Interregional Interactions (J. Jennings) (return to timetable)

Since at least the Lower Paleolithic Period, interregional interaction has been fundamental to the development of cultures from around the world.  The movement of ideas, people, and objects across vast areas is not confined to the modern era, and in this course we will explore the role that interregional interaction has played in many of the most important processes in human history like the dispersal of Homo Erectus, the beginnings of social inequality, the origins of agriculture, the birth of cities, and the spread of civilizations. The course is run as a discussion seminar and readings for the course will consist largely of case studies from around the world and across time.  The major requirement for the course is a 20-25 page research paper that explores how changes in interregional interaction changed society in one particular region of the world.

ANT 4065H S – Specific Problems II: Paleolithic Archaeology (G. Dewar) (return to timetable)

This graduate seminar provides a foundation in the anthropology and archaeology of small-scale societies, particularly hunter-gatherers. The seminar’s temporal remit is broad, spanning ~2.5 million years of human evolution from the earliest tool-making hominins to living human societies. A selection of critical topics will therefore be covered. These include theoretical aspects of and evolutionary trends in forager subsistence; technologies; mobility and use of space; sociopolitical organization; cognition; symbolism, ritual and religion; and transitions to food production. Topics will be illustrated using diverse case studies drawn from throughout the Paleolithic, with an emphasis on the Old World.

ANT 5150H S – Nation, State, and Language in Francophone Canada (M. Heller) (return to timetable)

This course will offer a linguistic anthropological approach to understanding ideologies and practices of language, identity, nation and state in francophone Canada, and more broadly in francophone North America, with attention to imperialism, colonialism, modernity and globalization. It will cover the period from French colonization (New France) to the present, covering language ideological debates and discursive struggles for power, as well as the boundaries, erasures, and exclusions they produce. There will be opportunities for empirical investigation, whether historical or contemporary.

ANT 6003H F – Critical Issues in Ethnography (J. Boddy) (return to timetable)

‘Ethnography’ is at once a (relatively disciplined) practice of interpersonal engagement, and the results of this practice conveyed and transformed through writing.  In this course we examine books variously positioned within the realm of ‘ethnography’ in an effort to become more familiar with what the genre entails. The selected texts are thematically linked by concerns for place, time, subject/person, power and subjugation. Each provides a point of departure for exploring a range of ethnographic methods and theoretical models. We examine issues such as authorial positioning and voice, use of ‘plot’, narrative style, characterization, and representation, all the while attending to the means by which the ethnography was produced and its historical and intellectual context.

ANT 6006H S – Genealogies of Anthropological Thought (T. Sanders) (return to timetable)

This course is intended primarily for PhD students

This course aims to acquaint students with an intellectual history of socio-cultural and linguistic anthropology (SCL). This is a large and multifaceted topic, and thus this course cannot pretend to be a comprehensive mapping of the subfield. Rather, it explores a set of key intellectual movements, controversies and concerns. It is intended to provide students with an historically-informed understanding of certain foundational questions within SCL, as well as an appreciation of anthropologists’ varied efforts to theorise and answer them. Ultimately the course aims to equip students with the ability to conceptualize and frame a problem within the broader history of SCL.

ANT 6014H F – Media and Mediation (F. Cody/A. Paz) (return to timetable)

This reading-intensive seminar focuses on ethnographic approaches to the process of mass mediation, with specific reference to critical theories of semiotics.  The course combines “classic” theoretical texts drawn from a range of disciplines with more empirical accounts of how communicative processes are integral to large-scale social formations, and how such processes influence our current understanding of mass politics, publicity, social movements, “big data,” racialization, warfare, digitalization, migrant diasporas, and the possibility of a global subject.  Placing our understanding of media technologies within the more encompassing concept of mediation, this course asks what ethnographic accounts can offer to the interdisciplinary field of media studies.

ANT 6027H F – Anthropology of Violence (C. Krupa) (return to timetable)

This course examines anthropological approaches to the study of violence. Violence has long been a central focus for anthropological research. One of the overarching ambitions in much of this research has been to make violence meaningful in some respect. Violence can be given meaning in any number of ways. For example, it can be analyzed as being part of a system of exchange, a system of sacrifice, a system of debt, a system of law-making, or a system of signs. More recently, however, studies of violence have started to emphasize the importance of failures in meaning. In this regard, it could be argued that violence describes the limits of the human capacity to give meaning to events.
This course provides an overview of anthropological and related theories of violence. Some of the central theorists considered in the course are Benjamin, Arendt, Derrida, Foucault, and Agamben. The course then situates these theories within the context of ethnographic cases. The varieties of violence considered in these ethnographies range from forms of violence normally associated with small-scale societies (circumcision, tribal warfare, headhunting, witchcraft killings, etc.) to the forms of violence perpetrated by modern states and their citizens (modern warfare, torture, incarceration, rape, police violence, vigilantism, etc.)

ANT 6029H S – Anthropology of Capitalism (S. Satsuka) (return to timetable)

The course examines capitalism as unevenly formed clusters of cultural practices and belief systems. In this seminar, we will analyze the social and cultural aspects of value and exchange, and compare various forms of capitalism. Some of the fundamental principles and practices of the capitalist system entail contradictions, tensions and enigmatic conventions. While these tensions generate debates as well as many social problems, in everyday life these foundational ideas and practices are often left unquestioned. For instance: How is the equivalence of exchange assumed in a market? How does money work? How does a thing become a commodity? How is “value” produced? We will bring in anthropological modes of inquiry in order to analyze the social and cultural specificities of ideas and practices that support capitalism, and to examine how people engage and disengage with these ideas and practices. We will investigate how capitalist and other forms of social interaction co-exist, compete with, and transform one another. Specific attention will be paid to the social and historical context in which particular forms of capitalism have emerged.

This year’s focus is “ecology and economy.” In particular, we will read some foundational classic texts together with the recent ethnography on the circulation of energy, resource and labor. Yet, at the same time, we will anthropologically question the assumed fundamental frameworks and metaphors, including “circulation”.

ANT 6031H S – Research Seminar: Infrastructures (W. Butt) (return to timetable)

Infrastructures are socio-technical assemblages that ensure the movement of things, such as water, power, information, commodities, and people, across space and time. Though anthropological interest is relatively recent, infrastructures have been constitutive components of contemporary life since the global expansion of liberal democracy, the nation-state, and capitalism. This course draws upon writings from anthropology, geography, sociology, science and technology studies, and the humanities to explore how infrastructures organize and are organized by cultural, economic, political, and social life. What is the genealogy of infrastructures in the contemporary world? What do these infrastructures enable the movement of, and how? What does an ethnography of infrastructures look like? How does studying infrastructure push our thinking of the political in liberal democracies and under capitalism? And what can these studies reveal about questions of violence, racism, and inequality on a global scale?

 ANT 6032H F – Advanced Research Seminar: Disability Anthropology (C. Hartblay) (return to timetable)

This advanced graduate research seminar foregrounds the interplay of theory and method in interrogating what it means to study disability from a sociocultural anthropological perspective. Reading recent works in the field, we will consider how ethnographers theorize disability and debility in terms of medicalization, normal/abnormal/queer, mobility, infrastructure, kinship, care, identity and agency, global capitalism and productive labor, the welfare state, decoloniality and radical alterity, digital communication, and human rights and NGOs. Our readings will address a variety of types disability – sensory, motor, mental – and the specific concerns that each raise, and will engage with a diversity of global geographic, cultural, and political locations. Throughout the term, we will work to stake out the breadth of contemporary disability anthropology, an emerging subfield entwined with both queer and medical anthropology, informed by critical disability studies, yet distinct in its ethical-methodological concerns. The course is particularly suited to graduate students who are interested in an ethnographic approach to making sense of disability as difference in social worlds.

ANT 6033H S – Research Seminar: Unsettling Settler Colonialism (B. McElhinny) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 6040H F – Research Design and Fieldwork Methods (H. Luong) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 6055H S – Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood (V. Napolitano) (return to timetable)

Personhood, subjectivity and human nature lies at the heart of anthropology inquiry: the meaning and relationship of self and other; how representations of human nature have developed and have shaped an imagination of a (Western) anthropos; the tensions between universality, particularity and singularity; the exchange between humans and non-humans. This course addresses the place of personhood and subjectivity from debates around themes such as the “Religious Subject”, the “Precarious Subject” and “Beyond-the-Subject”. The goal of the course is to introduce students to theoretical frameworks that have effectively been employed by anthropologists when studying personhood, subject and human nature, and also to think them through themes such as ‘will’, ‘blood’ and ‘cannibalism’.  This course will be run as a seminar with evaluation based on participation, one oral presentation, weekly reports, and a final paper.

ANT 6059H F – Anthropology and History (I. Kalmar) (return to timetable)

TBA

ANT 6060H F – Anthropology and Indigenous Studies in North America (K. Maxwell) (return to timetable)

This graduate seminar course brings anthropologists and indigenous studies scholars into dialogue, through reading ethnographies centred on Indigenous experience in North America alongside influential, recent theoretical interventions in indigenous studies. We will contextualise this contemporary scholarship by reading critical histories of the formation of indigenous studies and anthropology as academic disciplines in the United States and Canada.  Our discussions will span Indigenous sovereignties and kinship; settler colonialism as historicized and contemporary cultural and political formation; contributions and limitations of ethnographic research and academic critique; and the relationship between scholarship and activism. The course aims to foster critical and creative thinking among anthropology graduate students and those from other disciplines regarding the potential contributions and pitfalls of anthropological engagement with Indigenous people/s in the present.

ANT 6100H F – History of Anthropological Thought – SCL MA required (D. Begun) (return to timetable)

As an introduction to the history of anthropological thought, this MA-level core course aims to familiarize students with the key thinkers, theoretical approaches, and ethnographic innovations that shaped the discipline between the late 1800’s and the 1980’s.  It likewise considers the kinds of knowledge, ethics, and modes of both representation and analysis these different approaches approaches have demanded.  An understanding of the historically situated character of our discipline is a crucial component of our contemporary practice, and this includes taking seriously the intellectual genealogies out of which–and often against which—contemporary thought has emerged.

ANT 6150H Y – Proposing Ethnographic Research (SCL PhD Core) (V. Bozcali) (return to timetable)

This seminar aims to assist doctoral students to develop thesis and research grant proposals. Throughout the seminar, the participants will be guided step by step to produce effective proposals for anthropological fieldwork. The seminar is designed as an intensive writing workshop that is based on timely sharing of work and peer-discussion. Run in workshop style, the seminar will help participants to develop skills of giving and receiving constructive comments on each other’s writing.

ANT 6200H F – Ethnographic Practicum (T. Li) (return to timetable)

Participants in this class conduct an independent ethnographic inquiry, analyse data, write it up and publish it on the  Ethnography Lab website as an original contribution to knowledge. The premise of the class is that the most effective way to learn how to do ethnographic research is by actually doing it, with guidance and plenty of opportunity for feedback. The format of the class is collaborative. Each year the class has a common theme. All students identify a research site related to the theme, usually a site within the University of Toronto where they will conduct primary ethnographic research, and bring issues of research design, ethics, theory and analysis to the weekly group session for collective brainstorming. Assignments include individual weekly blog posts, collective synthesis and writing for the website, and an individual final report.

The theme for 2018 is politics. Specifically, we will explore  the conditions under which, and the practices through which, a critical sensibility – a gut feeling that something is not right with the world – does, or does not, morph into collective action to bring about change. Participants interested in the kinds of critical politics that challenge formations of capital (or gender, or race, or nature …) could select sites in which such a challenge is well advanced; or they might be more interested in sites in which a critical politics might be expected to emerge but is absent or interrupted, begging the question – why? Sites may include classrooms, locker rooms, dorms, clubs, unions, cafeterias – anywhere that groups of people might potentially identify grievances and act on them. Don’t worry if you don’t have a topic or site in mind at the outset. Bring your half-baked ideas to the first class, and we’ll brainstorm collectively to turn them into something interesting, researchable, and well worth 12 weeks of your time.

ANT 7001H S – Medical Anthropology I​: Lively Matters: Inquiries into Science, Medicine, and the Body (K. Bright) (return to timetable)

In this course we consider contributions social theory can make to anthropological studies of science and medicine. How have broader inquiries into the nature of the body, ontology, relationality, and the self by thinkers such as Ibn Sina, Descartes, Merleau-Ponty, Althusser, Levinas, Bourdieu, Foucault, Latour, Das, Deleuze, Butler, Mol, and Rose influenced ethnographic investigations? Through readings, films, and discussion, we examine how theory can help us to freshly approach new and old anthropological objects such as colonial systems of science, genetics, organ transplant, mental health, chronic disease, biopolitics, fitness, health, and new biotechnologies. By combining a study of several traditions of theory with a focus on how anthropologists have engaged them, this course aims to present theory not as a set of abstractions but a way of animating our study of science in everyday life. The texts we read will offer points of insertion students can engage with in their own thinking and writing. In addition to weekly reading responses, students prepare a substantial paper to be presented in a group symposium or “theory jam” at the end of the course.

ANT 7002H S – Medical Anthroplogy II – Applied Biocultural Perspectives on Global Child Health (M. Heller) (return to timetable)

TBA