M.A., M.Sc., and Ph.D. Programs

For detailed description of graduate programs, please refer to the Department of Anthropology Graduate Student Handbook.

Xhosa Mother and Son, by Kathleen Rice
Xhosa Mother and Son, rural former-Transkei, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Photo by Ph.D. Candidate Kathleen Rice.

Program Requirements

Master of Arts Program
Master of Science Program
Doctor of Philosophy Program – Direct Entry & Regular Stream
Collaborative Programs

Degree of Master of Arts and Master of Science

The Department offers two graduate programs at the master’s level — Master of Arts and Master of Science. The Master of Arts degree program is offered in the five sub-fields of Anthropology, and the Master of Science is normally offered in archaeology, medical and evolutionary anthropology. Both programs begin with broad-based training in Anthropology and proceed to more specialized work, culminating in the completion of a research paper on a special topic. Upon admission, students are assigned an Advisor.

Time to completion of Master’s programs:

a) M.A.—“normally 12 months”. Students can register for up to three years

b) M.Sc.—“normally 2 years”. Students can register for up to three years

EXTENSIONS: A maximum of three one year extensions are allowed by SGS

  1. Two extensions can be granted within the department. The third requires SGS and department approval
  2. Extensions are not automatic
  3. Students can be “terminated” after three extensions or if extensions are not approved

Master of Arts Program

The Master of Arts program normally extends over a 12-month period lasting from September to August, formal instruction being offered from September to April. Collaborative programs may take longer. The M.A. program may also be taken on a part-time basis. Students are strongly urged to take the 12-month M.A. if they are considering applying for the Ph.D. program in Anthropology at the University of Toronto.

Program Requirements:
All M.A. students must complete the equivalent of 4.0 full-year graduate course equivalents (FCE) NOTE: at least 2.5 FCE must be in Anthropology.

  • The following courses are required:

ANT 1000H – Introductory Master’s Workshop (0.5 FCE)
ANT 2000Y – M.A. Research Paper (1.0 FCE) – Normally, students enroll in ANT 2000Y with their advisor. When a student is ready to submit a master’s research paper, the advisor, in consultation with the student, selects a second reader (normally, a faculty member in anthropology). The final mark for the master’s research paper is determined jointly by the advisor and the second reader. The advisor submits the final mark, along with the name of the second reader, to the graduate office.

MA and MSc students are required to take one of the following courses: ANT 1099H, ANT 3047H, ANT 4020H, ANT 6003H, ANT 6004H (0.5 FCE).

  • Each M.A. student is required to complete the equivalent of 2.0 additional FCE to be chosen in consultation with the Advisor. Master’s candidates wishing to graduate at a particular Convocation must ensure that all requirements have been completed in time for degree convocation.

Master of Science Program

The Master of Science program extends over a two-year period that would normally be expected to be completed in the summer of the second year. Collaborative programs may take longer. The M.Sc. Program may also be taken on a part-time basis. This program may be appropriate for students who are considering careers in consulting archaeology, some aspects of medical or forensic anthropology, NGO work, or application to Ph.D. programs in Anthropology at other universities.

Program Requirements:
All M.Sc. students must complete the equivalent of 5.0 full-year graduate course equivalents (FCE) NOTE: at least 2.5 FCE must be in Anthropology.

  • The following courses are required:

ANT 1000H – Introductory Master’s Workshop (0.5 FCE)

ANT 2500Y – M.Sc Research Paper (1.0 FCE) – Normally, students enroll in ANT 2500Y with their advisor. When a student is ready to submit a master’s research paper, the advisor, in consultation with the student, selects a second reader (normally, a faculty member in anthropology). The final mark for the master’s research paper is determined jointly by the advisor and the second reader. The advisor submits the final mark, along with the name of the second reader, to the graduate office.

MA and MSc students are required to take one of the following courses: ANT 1099H, ANT 3047H, ANT 4020H, ANT 6003H, ANT 6004H (0.5 FCE).

  • Each M.Sc. student is required to complete the equivalent of 3.0 additional graduate FCEs one-and-a-half of which must be designated science courses, to be chosen in consultation with the Advisor. Appropriate courses include those offered in evolutionary anthropology and archaeology (excluding history and theory courses), plus selections from other science departments.

Doctor of Philosophy Program – Direct-Entry and Regular Stream

An individual program of study is designed for each student to ensure competence in a field of research culminating in the writing of a thesis. Research will normally involve “field work”, in the broad meaning of the term, and theoretical analysis. Upon admission, each student is initially assigned to a Faculty Advisor. An Advisory Committee (faculty advisor and two other graduate faculty members) will be set up for each doctoral student within the first year of the program. After acceptance of the thesis proposal, a Supervisor and Core Committee are appointed. At least one member of the core committee, in addition to the advisor/supervisor, is required to hold a graduate faculty appointment in the Anthropology Department.

Ph.D. students may enroll in a Collaborative Program as approved by the Department.

Doctoral Program Description and Requirements:

1. Residence Requirement

Each student is expected to spend a minimum of one year on campus.

2. Course Requirements

Students in the Ph.D. program are required to take one of the following courses:     ANT 1099H, ANT 3047H, ANT 4020H, ANT 6006H, ANT 6040H.

Students who enter the Ph.D. program from a BA or BSc degree program are entering a five-year Direct-Entry Stream Ph.D. program. They will take a minimum of 5.0 full-year graduate course equivalents (FCE), of which three will normally be taken in the first year. The remaining two FCE can be taken in the second year when the work on the research proposal is also expected to begin. Students will need to attain an annual average of at least A- to continue in the Ph.D. program in good standing.  Of the five FCE, 1.5 FCE must be in anthropology. Exceptions require approval of Supervisor and Graduate Coordinator.

Students who enter the Ph.D. program from a MA or MSc degree program are entering a four-year Regular Stream Ph.D. program. They will take a minimum of 3.0 full-year graduate course equivalents (FCE), Students will need to attain at least an A- average in their course work to continue in the Ph.D. program in good standing. Of the three full-year course equivalents, 1.5 FCE must be in anthropology. Exceptions require approval of Supervisor and Graduate Coordinator.

Students and faculty should be familiar with the University of Toronto Endrenyi Rules regarding graduate student supervision http://www.ehs.utoronto.ca/resources/manindex/policies/fieldres.htm 

They should also be familiar with the Student Code of Conduct regarding conflict of interest, sexual harassment, and other matters http://www.governingcouncil.utoronto.ca/policies/studentc.htm.

3. Language Requirements

Students must demonstrate an adequate knowledge of at least one language other than English, unless their program of study requires the intensive and time-consuming mastery of another research tool. Demonstration of adequate language or equivalent knowledge can be accomplished in a variety of ways, a list of which is available in the Department of Anthropology Graduate Student Handbook.

Collaborative Programs

The Department of Anthropology offers graduate studies in collaboration with the programs listed below. For collaborative programs, students must first be admitted to a graduate program in the Department. Many Collaborative Program requirements fulfill Anthropology degree requirements, e.g., as elective courses. Courses in a Collaborative Program may, however, exceed minimum degree requirements in Anthropology. Please visit the individual collaborative program sites for further information:

Aboriginal Health (M.A., Ph.D.)

The Collaborative Program in Aboriginal Health involves the graduate units of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology, Anthropology, Geography, Medical Science, Nursing Science, Nutritional Sciences, Public Health Sciences, and Sociology and Equity Studies in Education; it is in collaboration with the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ Aboriginal Studies Program. The main objective of the program is to provide graduate training in Aboriginal health research and practice while enhancing mutually beneficial relationships with Aboriginal communities and organizations.

Director: Amanda Sheppard

Website: http://www.cpah.utoronto.ca/

Addiction Studies (Ph.D.)

The graduate units of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology; Anthropology; Biomedical Engineering; Criminology; Information Studies; Medical Science; Pharmaceutical Sciences; Pharmacology; Psychology; Public Health Sciences; Social Work; and Sociology, in collaboration with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, and the Ontario Tobacco Research Unit, participate in the Collaborative Program in Addiction Studies at the University of Toronto. The purpose of the program is to develop and integrate graduate training in the multidisciplinary field of addictions, an area that includes the use and abuse of alcohol, tobacco, and psychoactive substances, as well as gambling and other addictive behaviours. Master’s programs requiring a thesis, practicum, or research paper, and Ph.D. programs are included. Applicants who wish to enrol in the Collaborative Program must apply to and be admitted to both the Collaborative Program and a graduate degree program in one of the collaborating departments.

Director: Bruna Brands – (416) 535-8501 ext. 6860

Website: http://www.dlsph.utoronto.ca/page/collaborative-program-addiction-studies

Aging, Palliative and Supportive Care Across the Life Course (M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D.)

The Collaborative Program prepares students for specialization in the field of aging and/or the field of palliative and supportive care, with an emphasis on viewing aging issues within the perspective of the life course. As of September 2006, the Collaborative Program offers students two options of study:

· aging and the life course

· palliative and supportive care

Interim Director: Esme Fuller-Thomson – 416-978-7065

Program Assistant – 416-978-7037

Website: http://aging.utoronto.ca/

Little India, Kuala Lumpur. Photo by Kristy Bard
Little India, Kuala Lumpur. Photo by Kristy Bard.

Asia-Pacific Studies (M.A.)

Graduate units in Anthropology, East Asian Studies, Economics, Geography, History, Management, Political Science, Social Work, Sociology, and Women and Gender Studies participate in the collaborative master’s degree program in Asia-Pacific Studies at the University of Toronto. The collaborating units contribute courses and provide facilities and supervision for master’s level research. This program is administered by a Program Committee chaired by a Program Director.

The collaborative master’s degree program in Asia-Pacific Studies is designed to provide graduates with advanced training in a particular discipline and in the historical and social science studies of modern East and Southeast Asia. The major topics of emphasis in the collaborative master’s degree program are political economy, modern and contemporary social history, international relations, gender, political and social change, economic development, and cultural studies. The collaborative master’s degree program in Asia-Pacific Studies contributes to the development of an integrated and interdisciplinary research community in Asia-Pacific Studies at the University of Toronto.

Director: Jacques Bertrand – 416-946-8985

Website: http://webapp.mcis.utoronto.ca/asiapacific-ma/

Email: asiapacific.ma@utoronto.ca

Diaspora and Transnational Studies (M.A., Ph.D.)

The Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in Diaspora and Transnational Studies is designed to bring together both social science and humanities at  perspectives at the graduate level to augment our already existing tri-campus undergraduate program and to contribute to increased research collaboration among participants in the program. It is being set up in response to popular demand by advanced students of the current DTS undergraduate program as well as the many expressions of interest from students keen on thorough graduate training in the field from within Canada and well beyond. The Collaborative Program will be distinctive by being interdisciplinary as well as comparative. Whilst raising questions about diasporic communities in Canada, this will not be the primary focus of the Collaborative Program.  Rather, the Canadian example will be a means towards understanding the nature of diaspora and transnationalism elsewhere in North America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Global South.  Students must apply to and be admitted to both the Collaborative Program and a graduate degree program of a collaborating unit.  Students who complete the program at the Master’s level will not be eligible for the program at the Doctoral level.

Director: Ato Quayson

Website: http://www.utoronto.ca/cdts/graduate.html

Email: cdts@utoronto.ca

Muara Baru stilt architecture, by Lukas Ley
Photo by graduate student Lukas Ley. Stilt architecture in the poor neighborhood Muara Baru in Jakarta, Indonesia, which was located on the banks of a floodwater reservoir – the around 10.000 inhabitants of this neighborhood were relocated in summer 2013 to make space for a promenade.

 Environmental Studies (M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D.)

The graduate units of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology; Anthropology; Chemistry; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Economics; Forestry; Geography; Geology; Information Studies; Management; Philosophy; Planning; Political Science; Religion; Sociology; Sociology and Equity Studies; and Women and Gender Studies, in conjunction with the Centre for Environment, offer collaborative graduate programs in Environmental Studies.

Director: Kimberly Strong – 416-978-6526

Program Assistant – 416-978-3475

Website: http://www.environment.utoronto.ca/Graduate/Programs/EnvironmentalStudiesCollaborativeProgram.aspx

Ethnic and Pluralism Studies (M.A., M.Sc., Ph.D.)

The graduate units of Anthropology; European, Russian, and Eurasian Studies; Geography; History; Industrial Relations and Human Resources; Nursing Science; Political Science, Religion; Social Work; and Sociology participate in the Ethnic and Pluralism Studies Collaborative Program at the University of Toronto. Participating graduate units in the program contribute courses and provide facilities and supervision for graduate research.

Director: Jeffrey G. Reitz – 416-946-8993

Program Assistant – ethnic.studies@utoronto.ca

Website: http://www.utoronto.ca/ethnicstudies/

Global Health (Ph.D.)

The graduate units of Public Health Sciences; Anthropology; Political Science; Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering (Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry); Dentistry; Law; Geography and Planning; Institute of Medical Sciences; Health Policy, Management and Evaluation; Nursing; Pharmacy; Rehabilitation Sciences; and Rotman School of Management participate in the Collaborative Doctoral Program in Global Health (CDPGH) at the University of Toronto. The Collaborative Doctoral Program in Global Health (CDPGH) is designed to deepen the knowledge base of doctoral students about multidisciplinary approaches to global health issues and challenges, provide career training related to global health research and practice, and help students develop skills that advance their research. The Collaborative Program views “global health” in an integrative manner.  It focuses on the relationships among local, regional, national, and international forces that influence health as well as on the development of effective interventions and policies.

Director: Jillian Kohler

Assistant Director: Uttam Bajwa

Program Assistant – 416-946-7909

Website: http://www.dlsph.utoronto.ca/program/collaborative-doctoral-program-in-global-health/ 

Jewish Studies (Ph.D.)

The purpose of the Collaborative Program in Jewish Studies is to offer both broad and intensive exposure to the constituent fields within Jewish Studies. Because of Jewish civilization’s vast chronological and geographical range, as well as its constant interaction and cross-fertilization with other cultures, graduate work within Jewish Studies demands intensive exposure to a wide variety of languages, textual traditions, and scholarly disciplines.

The collaborative program involves ten graduate units: Anthropology; English; Germanic Languages and Literatures; History; Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations; Philosophy; Political Science; Religion; Slavic Languages and Literature; and Sociology.

Director: Anna Shternshis – 416-978-8131

Program Assistant: 416-978-8118

Website: http://www.cjs.utoronto.ca/

Gagne, love is resistence
Love is Resistance, Beirut, Lebanon. Photo by graduate student Mathew Gagné. After 15 years of civil war and nearly 20 years of post-war reconstruction marred by on-going economic privatization, political crisis, and sectarian strife, young Lebanese have begun to push back with narratives of love, connection, and hope for a future that is not based on the norms of before their parent’s time.

 Sexual Diversity Studies (M.A., Ph.D.)

The Collaborative Program in Sexual Diversity Studies is a rigorously interdisciplinary program recognizing sexual diversity studies as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry. While it has emerged as an autonomous scholarly area, many of those who work within sexual diversity studies engage questions of gender, ethnicity, race, Aboriginal status, (dis)ability, and class, to highlight the importance of exploring their interaction with sexual differences.

Director: Brenda Cossman – 416-819-1921

Program Assistant – 416-978-6276

Website: http://www.uc.utoronto.ca/sexualdiversity

South Asian Studies (M.A., Ph.D.)

The interdisciplinary Collaborative Master’s and Doctoral Program in South Asian Studies is designed for students who wish to acquire a nuanced understanding of South Asia as a secondary area of specialization while pursuing graduate studies in another discipline. The focus of this program is necessarily broad in that it provides students with an understanding of ancient and modern history, social change, economic development, contemporary politics, religious traditions, literary culture, and a spectrum of related topics.

The Centre for South Asian Studies, which administers the Collaborative Program, provides a nucleus for the participation of South Asian Studies scholars from across the University. Students will benefit from the physical presence of the Centre for South Asian Studies and its regular activities of research fora, conferences, and visiting lecturer and scholar programs. In addition, the University of Toronto’s library collection in South Asian studies is the largest in Canada.

Director: Rita Burla – csas.director@utoronto.ca

Program Assistant – 416-946-8979, csas.assist@utoronto.ca

Website: http://munkschool.utoronto.ca/csas/

Women’s Health (M.A., Ph.D.)

The Collaborative Program in Women’s Health provides interdisciplinary training in women’s health research and practice for graduate students at the University of Toronto with the goal of:

· Helping students develop shared understandings of the complex interactions of biology and environment, sex and gender;

· Providing students with the necessary skill set to undertake and lead interdisciplinary, collaborative health care research projects;

· Enhancing mutually beneficial relationships among researchers and practitioners of women’s health across the University and its affiliated teaching hospitals.

Director: Gillian Einstein – 416-978-0896

Program Assistant – 416-351-3732 ext. 2720

Website: http://www.womensresearch.ca/learning-centre/graduate-programs/collaborative-graduate-program

Rural Xhosa woman at home, by Kathleen Rice
Xhosa woman at home, Rural former-Transkei, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. Photo by Ph.D. Candidate Kathleen Rice.

Women and Gender Studies (M.A., Ph.D.)

The Graduate Collaborative Program in Women and Gender Studies (CWGS) provides a formal educational context for the purpose of interdisciplinary research in women and gender studies and advanced feminist scholarship. The program, offered at the master’s and doctoral levels, provides a central coordinating structure to facilitate and disseminate women and gender studies research through graduate student research symposia, lectures, circulation and discussion of work in progress, conferences, and publications. CWGS contributes to the development of an integrated research community in women and gender studies at the University of Toronto. Applicants to the program are expected to meet the admission and degree requirements of both the home department and CWGS.

Director: Marieme Lo – 416-946-3218

Email: grad.womenstudies@utoronto.ca

Program Assistant – 416-978-3668

Website: http://www.wgsi.utoronto.ca/graduate/applications/wgs-collaborative-program-application