Events

Anthropology Dept. Professionalization Committee – Tri-Council Grant Writing Workshop for PhD students

Date: Friday, 22 September, 9:30am-12:30pm,  AP 246

For interested students, please send your grant applications for review to Edward Swenson (edward.swenson@utoronto,ca) by Monday, September 18.

This workshop is specifically designed to help PhD Anthropology graduate students refine and sharpen their applications for Tri-Council (SSHRC, NSERC, CIHR) funding. Students will workshop their application drafts, receive professor and peer feedback, and read and comment on their peers’ applications.

 

Anthropology Dept. Colloquium Speakers Series – Professor Eldon Yellowhorn, Chair, First Nations Studies, Simon Fraser University

Date:  Friday 22 September, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, AP 246

Professor Eldon Yellowhorn
Department of Archaeology & Department of First Nations Studies, Simon Fraser University

“From the Dog Days to the Rez: A Piikani Archaeologist Searches for the Roots of his Culture”
Studying Piikani culture, which is one branch of Niitsitapi (Blackfoot people), has been my main focus since my early days in graduate school. I was always motivated by wanting to learn more about the continuum of Piikani history beginning in the Dog Days, then the Horse Days, the end of the Buffalo Days and the onset of the reserve days. Advancing the goals of my historical archaeology research means triangulating the data from archival, oral history and material culture sources to gain insights about the early reserve days after 1880. Through the course of my career I have also examined Blackfoot oral narratives to better understand their archaeological manifestations. Having done so I can now apply absolute dates to some Blackfoot myths and I can organize them in chronological order. The goal of my research is to construct a new Blackfoot history since ancient times.

click on the event in the calendar above for more information, and registration

 

Anthropology Dept. Professionalization Committee – Academic Professionalization Workshop

Date: Friday, 29 September, 9:00am-1:00pm,  AP 246

This workshop is designed to assist students with letter writing, CVs, and mastering the art of interviews. Coordinators will also offer guidelines for preparing a teaching portfolio and navigating the job market.

 

Anthropology Dept. Colloquium Speakers Series – Professor Filip de Boeck, Institute for Anthropological Research in Africa (IARA), University of Leuven, Belgium

This talk is co-sponsored by the Centre for Ethnography UTSC and African Studies

Date:  Friday 29 September, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, AP 246

Reframing the City between anthropology and photography
On the occasion of the opening of “Urban Now, City Life in Congo”, an exhibition by anthropologist Filip De Boeck and photographer Sammy Baloji at The Power Plant, a leading Canadian non-collecting art gallery (Toronto, 29 Sept – 31 December 2017), this talk will address the possibilities of combining ethnography and photography to de-center urban theory and reframe urban anthropology, in an attempt to explore in novel ways what living, and living together, might mean in Central Africa’s urban worlds today.Bio:
Anthropologist Filip De Boeck is based at the Institute for Anthropological Research in Africa (IARA) at the University of Leuven, Belgium. Since 1987 he has conducted extensive field research in both rural and urban communities in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Opening party of Filip’s exhibition; all welcome  28 Septemberhttp://toronto.carpediem.cd/events/4411724-fall-2017-season-opening-party-at-the-power-plant-contemporary-art-gallery/


click on the event in the calendar above for registration

Anthropology Dept. Professionalization Committee – Tri-Council Grant Writing Workshop for MSC students

Date: Friday, 20 October, 9:30am-12:30pm,  AP 246

For interested students, please send your grant applications for review to Edward Swenson (edward.swenson@utoronto.ca) by Monday, October 16.

This workshop is designed to assist MSC Anthropology graduate students write successful applications for Tri-Council (SSHRC, NSERC, CIHR) funding. Students will workshop their application drafts, receive professor and peer feedback, and read and comment on their peers’ applications.

 

Anthropology Dept. Colloquium Speakers Series – Professor David Killick, School of Anthropology, University of Arizona, USA

Date:  Friday 20 October, 2:00pm – 4:00pm, AP 246

“Gold or Iron?  Comparing the Production and Uses of Metals in the Andres and Sub-Saharan African before 1500”

The prehistories of metallurgy in the Andes and in sub-Saharan Africa could hardly be more different. In the Andes the focus was firmly upon gold and silver (sometimes alloyed with copper) to produce a range of colors for display of status and for religious ritual. Copper was smelted from at least the early centuries AD, and some of it was alloyed with arsenic, tin or nickel to make tools. But the smelting of copper was on so small a scale that it never entirely displaced stone tools in agriculture or warfare, and iron was never used before the arrival of the Spanish.   In some parts of sub-Saharan Africa gold was abundant, but Africans didn’t use or value it until the Muslim era, when Muslim demand for the metal was a major factor in the formation of states in West and Southern Africa. In most of sub-Saharan Africa, iron was the first metal used. The scale of the archaeological evidence for African iron production is vastly greater than that for the production of metals in the Andes. Copper was reserved in Africa for personal ornaments and as a means for storing wealth, but although there are many sources of tin ore in the subcontinent, there was no use of bronze before the Muslim era. I suggest that the striking differences in the production and uses of metals in these two subcontinents reflect fundamental, and quite stable, differences in beliefs about the inherent qualities of metals, and their proper roles in social life, in each region.

click on the event in the calendar above for registration