2017-18 Anthropology Graduate Timetable

Campus Map

Fall 2017- Graduate Anthropology September Session Classes Begin September 11, 2017

Monday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
 Campus
ANT 6100H F History of Anthropological Thought (*Core Course) SCL 1-4pm  AP 367 S. Hillewaert & K. Kilroy-Marac STG
ANT 4020H F Archaeology Theory (*Core Course) ARCH 2-5pm  AP 140 C. Cipolla STG

Tuesday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Location
Instructor
Campus
ANT 3031H F ADV Research Seminar I: Sleep and primate evolution: Theory, methods, and application EVO 11-1pm AP 367 D.Samson STG
ANT 6037H F Advanced Research Seminar VII: Anthropology of Affects SCL 12-2pm AP 246 V. Napolitano STG
ANT 4066H F Household Archaeology ARCH 2-4pm AP 140 G. Coupland STG
ANT 1096H F Quantitative Methods I EVO 2-4pm AP 367

L.

Schroeder

STG
ANT 6006H F  Genealogies of Anthropological Thought (*SCL PhD Core Course) SCL 3-6pm AP 246 N. Dave STG

Wednesday

 Course
Title
Field
Time
Location
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6019H F Anthropology of Neoliberalism SCL 11-1pm  AP 367 J. Song STG
ANT 3439H F Advanced Seminar in Forensic Anthropology EVO 1-4pm  HSC 332 T. Rogers UTM
ANT 4039H F Origin and Nature of Food Producing Societies ARCH 1-4pm  HSC 424 D. Smith UTM
ANT 6031H F ADV Research Seminar I: Communicating Citizenship SCL 2-5pm AP 367 A. Paz STG

Thursday

Course
Title
Field
Time
 Location
Instructor
Campus
ANT 3034H F Theory and Methods in Biocultural Anthropology EVO 10-12pm  AP 140 T. Galloway STG
Seminar for Senior SCL PhD Students Thesis writing seminar (runs both terms) SCL 10-1pm  AP 102A A. Mittermaier STG
ANT 6003H F Critical Issues in Ethnography I SCL 10-1pm  AP 246 J. Boddy STG
ANT 6040H F Research Design and Fieldwork Methods (*SCL PhD Recommended Course) SCL 2-4pm  AP 367 V. Luong STG

Winter 2018 – Graduate Anthropology January Session Classes Begin January 8, 2018

Monday

Course
Title
Field
Time
 Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT 6055H S Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood SCL 11-1 pm  AP 367 G. Daswani  STG
ANT 6060H S Anthropology & Indigenous Studies in North America SCL 1-4pm  AP 367 K. Maxwell  STG
ANT 3047H S Evolutionary Anthropology Theory  (*Core Course) EVO 2-4pm  AP 140 B. Viola  STG
ANT 5151H S Metaphor, Culture, and Science SCL 4-6pm  AP 367 M. Danesi  STG

Tuesday

Course
Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
JSA 5147H S Language, Nationalism and Post-Nationalism SCL 10-12pm  AP 330 M. Heller STG
ANT 1099H S Quantitative Methods II EVO 11-2pm  AP 367 M. Schillaci STG
ANT 4040H S Archeology of Hunter Gatherers ARCH 1-3pm  AP 140 M. Friesen STG
ANT 6018H S Approaches to Nature and Culture SCL 2-4pm  AP 367 H. Cunningham STG
ANT 6033H S Advanced Research Seminar III: Art(s) of living SCL 2-5pm  AP 246 M. Lambek & J. Sidnell STG
ANT 6059H S Anthropology and History SCL 4-6pm  AP 367 I. Kalmar STG

Wednesday

Course
 Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT 4065H S Specific Problems: Lithic Analysis ARCH 10-12pm AP 140 M.Chazan STG
ANT 3440H S Molecular Anthropology, theory and practice EVO 10-12pm  AP 367 E. Parra STG
ANT 4038H S Archaeology of Urban Development ARCH 1-4pm  AP 140 J. Jennings STG
ANT 6034H S Advanced Research Seminar IV: Inspiration and Immunity, Life and World: Reading Peter Sloterdijk SCL 2:30-5:30pm  AP 246 N. Dave/Co-taught with William Mazzarella (University of  Chicago) STG
ANT 6038H S Advanced Research Seminar VIII: Experts and Expertise SCL 3-5pm  AP 367 T. Sanders STG

Thursday

Course
 Title
Field
Time
Room
Instructor
Campus
ANT6035H S Politics of Cohabitation: Infrastructure, Multiple Ontologies, Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies (STS) SCL 10-12pm  AP 330 S. Satsuka STG
Seminar for Senior SCL PhD Students Thesis writing seminar (runs both terms) SCL 10-1pm  AP 102A  A. Mittermaier STG
ANT 7002H S Medical Anthropology II -Applied Biocultural Perspectives on Global Child Health EVO 11-1pm  AP 360 D. Sellen STG
ANT 4059H S Anthropological Understanding of Cultural Transmission ARCH 11-1pm  AP 367 L. Xie STG
ANT 3010H S Human Osteology: Theory and Practice EVO 2-4pm  AP 367 J. Gamble STG
ANT 4043H S Archaeology of Ritual, Religion, and Ideology ARCH 2-5pm  AP 140 E. Swenson STG
ANT 6032H S Advanced Research Seminar II: Med and Health as Epistemology, Politics & Social Practice SCL 2-5pm  AP 360 K. Bright STG

Courses of Interest in Other Departments

RLG 3290H S Word and Worship Mon 10-12pm S. Coleman Jackman Humanities Building, Rm 317
* CORE COURSE – see 2017 – 2018 Anthropology Graduate Handbook for program specific course requirements 

 

ANT 1096H F- Quantitative Methods I (L. Schroeder) (return to timetable)

This course will provide students with the basic analytic background necessary to evaluate quantitative data in biological anthropology and archaeology. Students will be introduced to foundational statistical concepts and research methods suitable for anthropological exploration. The focus will be on analysing univariate and bivariate data using both nonparametric and parametric statistical techniques, hypothesis testing, and methods of data collection. The goal is for students to learn how to manipulate simple datasets, ask and answer theoretically relevant questions, and choose the appropriate statistical test for a given research problem. Students will receive hands-on training during lab components and will learn how to analyse data using EXCEL and PAST. Students will have access to a number of biological anthropology and archaeology datasets for class assignments. No prior knowledge of statistics and mathematics is required.

   

ANT 1099H S- Quantitative Methods II (M. Schillaci) (return to timetable)

Course Description: This course will cover many of the multivariate statistical methods used by biological anthropologists and archaeologists such as principal components analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis including formal classification and canonical variates analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), multidimensional scaling, and cluster analysis. Students will be able to choose among physical anthropology and archaeology data sets for class assignments. Alternatively, students may use their own data sets for class assignments. No prior knowledge of statistics or mathematics is required.

 

ANT 3010H S – Human Osteology: Theory and Practice (J. Gamble)(return to timetable)

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of human osteology, beginning with a review of osteological evidence and progressing through a critical examination of some of the key directions in the field.  It will provide hands-on experience with human skeletal remains, diving into methods and theory in palaeoepidemiology.  It will consider some of the core challenges and innovations in the field, including consideration of concepts such as ‘stress’ and ‘health’ in past populations and the application of different levels of analysis.  Throughout the term, students will be challenged to think about the ethics of studying human remains in varying contexts.

  

ANT 3031H F – ADV Research Seminar I: Sleep and primate evolution: Theory, methods, and application (D.Samson) (return to timetable

This course examines our current understanding of primate sleep ecology and function, with a particular focus on how these elements drove the evolution of human sleep. The goal of the course is to provide students the prerequisite theoretical foundation and working knowledge of innovative methods (measuring the spectrum of behaviors on the inactive-active continuum) to propose informed, hypothesis driven research projects in their own area of interest.

    

ANT 3034H F – Theory and Methods in Biocultural Anthropology (T. Galloway)(return to timetable)

This course examines the development of biocultural approaches to theory and methods within the subdiscipline of biological anthropology, though the subject is of interest to students of diverse subdisciplinary interest since biocultural approaches are employed in such diverse fields as osteology, bioarchaeology, historical demography, the anthropology of infectious disease, and forensic anthropology. The course is intended as an exploration of the historical development of biocultural anthropology, from early writing in the 1990s to the seminal 1998 publication of The Biocultural Synthesis by Goodman and Leatherman. Critiques of the synthetic paradigm, accompanied by increasing emphasis within biological anthropology on adaptive and life history models, have led to conflicting applications of biocultural principles and concepts. The course culminates in an in-depth analysis of what currently constitutes biocultural theory and methods, along with some suggestions and justifications for employing biocultural approaches in students’ research.

 

ANT 3047H S – Evolutionary Anthropology Theory  (*Core Course) (B. Viola) (return to timetable)

 The course is an intensive exploration of the ideas that form the foundation and leading concepts in evolutionary anthropology; historically important readings and current concepts will be presented and discussed in the context of research, including areas of population biology, evolution of our lineage, broadly framed.

 

ANT 3439H F – Advanced Seminar in Forensic Anthropology (T. Rogers) (return to timetable)

Students will address advanced theory and method in Forensic Anthropology.  Topics include:  theory in forensic anthropology; professional practice, e.g. safety, ethics, liability, billing, case management, media training, managing an online presence, being an expert witness, etc.; search logistics and management; scene management and documentation; recovery and collection of evidence (including excavation of graves); forensic significance; sex determination; age estimation; ancestry; identification theory; peri- vs. post-mortem damage (including trauma analysis); and deliberate post-mortem destruction of a body.

 

ANT 3440H S-  Molecular Anthropology, theory and practice. (E. Parra) (return to timetable)

This course will introduce graduate students to Molecular Anthropology. This subfield of Biological Anthropology uses molecular information to study human variation, as well as the origin and evolution of our species. The course will cover important topics such as genome structure and organization, evolutionary factors (mutation, genetic drift, natural selection, gene flow), human genetic diversity, molecular evolution and molecular phylogenetics. The students will also be introduced to relevant electronic databases and repositories, such as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser and the 1000 Genomes website. The goal of the course is to show students how genetic data can be a powerful tool to explore longstanding questions in the field of anthropology, such as the origin of anatomically modern humans, how humans have adapted to a wide range of climatic and ecological conditions, and the relationship of human variation and disease, among others.

Note: This course has been primarily designed for graduate students in biological anthropology, assuming only a very basic background in molecular biology, population genetics and genomics.

 

ANT 4020H F – Archaeology Theory  (*Core Course) (C. Cipolla) (return to timetable)  

This seminar offers an in-depth examination of the history of archaeological theory and the major theoretical approaches defining the discipline today. Students explore competing schools of archaeological thought concerned with the study of material culture, past social formations, and historical process. From functionalist and natural science-focused positions to post-structural and postmodern inquiries into meaning, representation, and politics, to more recent archaeological attempts to de-center humans in hopes of liberating things, this seminar covers a diverse set of perspectives. Emphasis is placed on how shifting positions on human nature, social organization, alterity, gender, and power directly shape archaeological reconstructions and representations of the past. Ultimately, the seminar should provide students with a rich understanding of the theoretical frameworks that underpin contemporary archaeological research and the unique problems inherent in archaeological efforts to represent and interpret the material record.

  

ANT 4038H S – Archaeology of Urban Development (J. Jennings)(return to timetable

Since the work of V. Gordon Childe, archaeologists have recognized the importance of the urban revolution in human history.  Yet what happened within these cities was only one small part of this revolution.  Urbanization also created the countryside and the tenuous, shifting relationships that linked cities to farmers, herders, traders, pilgrims, and other people that lived outside the city walls.  In this seminar, we will examine the early relationship between city and countryside from around the world.  Each week we will read 3 articles on one aspect of this relationship and then discuss the articles in class.  Students will submit a reading report for 7 of these weeks. The one page, single-spaced report will distill the critical elements of each reading and link them to the broader themes of the course.  Each student will lead discussion for one week, as well as be asked to write a 20-25 page research paper that examines the city/countryside dynamic in one region of the world.

ANT 4039H F – The Origins and Nature of Early Resource Producing Societies (D. Smith) (return to timetable

This course covers both substantive and theoretical aspects of the transition from foraging to resource production. Regional case studies of primary and secondary areas of the shift to resource production throughout the world are investigated, and theoretical models to explain the transition are examined. The course will follow a seminar format, where the class will meet to discuss a particular topic. For each of these meetings, a team of students will be responsible for researching the topic in some detail and presenting a summary, while the rest of the class will be responsible for preparing questions for discussion. In addition, each student will prepare one research paper for submission. The paper will require the student to formulate a major topic for detailed investigation, write a paper on the research, and present the results to the class.

 

ANT 4040H S – Archaeology of Hunter Gatherers (M. Friesen) (return to timetable

This seminar course will focus on issues of method and theory applicable to the archaeology of hunter-gatherers in all geographic regions and time periods. “Hunter-gatherers” (a.k.a. foragers, gatherer-hunters, hunter-fisher-gatherers, etc.) collectively represent a huge proportion of the human past, and a shared aspect of the ancestry of all modern people. Following a brief survey of general issues such as variability in ethnographically-described societies, and the use of analogy in archaeology, the course will focus on recent scholarship across a range of aspects of hunter-gatherer societies, including (but not limited to) social organization, interaction, world view, gender roles, and economic organization.

ANT 4043H S – Archaeology of ritual, religion, and Ideology (E. Swenson)(return to timetable)

This course offers an intensive study of archaeological approaches to ritual, religion, and ideology within a comparative historical framework.  Students will examine key theoretical paradigms in the anthropology of religion while assessing the ways in which inferences on social process, identity politics, and prehistoric worldviews can be derived from ritual contexts preserved in the material record.  We will critically evaluate archaeological methods employed to identify the physical traces of ritual practice and will scrutinize in turn competing theories of past ceremonialism.  Other themes to be addressed in the course include: a critique of functionalist interpretations of religion popular in archaeological research; the materiality of ritual performance and the aesthetics of religious spectacles; and archaeological analyses of ritual deposits/landscapes to reconstruct past ontologies, power relations, historical change, and culturally specific structures of practice.

ANT 4059H S – Anthropological Understanding of Cultural Transmission (L. Xie) (return to timetable)

 Cultural transmission is the reproduction of information and practices in the forms of ideas, behaviors, and/or materials through social learning among intra-generational individuals, between societies, and from one generation to the next. The topic of cultural transmission has received increasing interest in many disciplines, such as biology, anthropology, sociology, psychology, and education.

This course examines the means of cultural transmission in both humans and non-humans. We will use case studies from multiple disciplines to discuss the biological and cognitive foundations of cultural transmission and the roles of cultural transmission in shaping behavioral patterns. Students should leave this course with a new understanding of the similarities and differences between human and non-human communities, and with a better understanding of the diversity, continuity and changes in our cultures over generations. 

 

ANT 4065H S – Specific Problems: Lithic Analysis (M. Chazan) (return to timetable)

ANT 4066H F – Household Archaeology (G. Coupland) (return to timetable

ANT 5151H S – Metaphor, Culture, and Science (M. Danesi)(return to timetable

This course will deal with the research and the theories in linguistics, psychology, and cognitive science that focus on the role of figurative language in the formation of ideas and in their “spill-over” into cultural and scientific forms and activities. One of the purposes of this course is to present the case for the study of what the Italian philosopher Giambattista Vico called poetic logic, or the perception and conception of the world as consisting of associations, inferences, and ingenious imaginative hunches that make up our expressive and cognitive artefacts, including all kinds of texts and models of the world. The recent work in cognitive semantics, embodied cognition, and cognitive anthropology is unwittingly revolving around the notion of poetic logic—a notion that makes it possible to study language, culture, and science as one system of cognition based on the same imaginative processes. The goal of the course is, therefore, to provide graduate students with a specific type of theoretical platform upon which to conduct research on the interconnection between figurative language and human expressive-scientific activities.

ANT 6003H F – Critical Issues in Ethnography I (SCL MA’s CORE COURSE) (J. Boddy) (return to timetable)

 ‘Ethnography’ is at once a (relatively disciplined) practice of interpersonal engagement, and the results of this practice conveyed and transformed through writing.  In this course we examine books variously positioned within the realm of ‘ethnography’ in an effort to become more familiar with what the genre entails. The selected texts are thematically linked by concerns for place, time, subject/person, power and subjugation. Each provides a point of departure for exploring a range of ethnographic methods and theoretical models. We examine issues such as authorial positioning and voice, use of ‘plot’, narrative style, characterization, and representation, all the while attending to the means by which the ethnography was produced and its historical and intellectual context.

ANT 6006H F – Genealogies of Anthropological Thought (N.Dave) (return to timetable)

This course is intended primarily for PhD students

This course is intended to acquaint students with an intellectual history of socio-cultural and linguistic anthropology (SCL). This is a large and multifaceted topic, and thus this course cannot pretend to be a comprehensive mapping of the subfield. Rather, it considers key intellectual movements and controversies, and it is intended to provide students with both an understanding of foundational texts within SCL, and a grasp of historical relationships between different theories and paradigms. Ultimately the aim of the course is to equip students with the ability to conceptualize and frame a problem within the broader history of SCL. Topics may include: structural-functionalism, structuralism, interpretive anthropology, Marxist anthropology and political economy, critiques of colonialism, and globalization. 

ANT 6018H S – Approaches to Nature and Culture (H. Cunningham) (return to timetable)

“Nature,” Raymond Williams wrote in Keywords, “is perhaps the most complex word in the language.” He notes that “…any full history of the uses of nature would be a history of a large part of human thought” (1987:219-21).

This course explores the ways in which the category of “nature” has been generated, contested, and re-fashioned by various thinkers who, in large part, make up a “canon” (i.e., an “assemblage”) of environmental thought. Through readings that encompass often quite substantially different approaches, this course seeks to engender discussion and debate about “nature” and its relation to other key concepts and approaches in social theory. Although the course adopts a roughly chronological and thematic framework, the readings have been specifically selected to draw out and investigate the contributions of different voices, and, consequently, to invite students into conversations with them.
The course deliberately engages with fiction and non-fiction and explores analytical themes of “borders,” “interfaces” and “entanglements”—that is, boundary-making as itself a multi-faceted encounter with “nature” and one which ultimately generates certain types of human-nature interactions while excluding or marginalizing other kinds. Because “borders” can encompass geophysical spaces, metaphysical categories, ecological zones, as well as human and non-human actors, we will be focusing on “nature” itself as a kind of borderscape.   

ANT 6019H F – Anthropology of Neoliberalism (J. Song) (return to timetable)

The 2008 Global Financial Crisis gave anthropologists a crucial opportunity to participate in the production and circulation of knowledge about finance– that is, about finance capital, financial markets, and financialization (Elyachar and Maurer 2009, Hart and Ortiz 2008). While acknowledging the challenge of understanding financial market mechanisms and terminology, researchers in economic anthropology and the anthropology of finance appeal to anthropology for a more pro-active attitude.

They ask how anthropology can contribute to understanding the current financialized socio-culture and political-economy and suggest that research on gift, money, and value can guide us to new insights on global finance. Upon their call, his class will critically engage in the economic anthropological literature dealing with gift, money, sociality, market, and value, combining interdisciplinary perspectives on finance within anthropology and beyond.

 

ANT 6031H F – ADV Research Seminar I: Communicating Citizenship (A. Paz) (return to timetable)

This course explores the communicative models that are found in a long history of theorizing citizenship, and especially Anthropology’s interpretation of these models. From theories of public spheres to ideas of interpellation and governmentality, citizenship has been discussed explicitly or implicitly in terms of how citizens are discursively, legally, and bureaucratically recognized. That is, these theories consider how, when and where a form of uptake occurs that is constitutive of citizens, especially vis-à-vis each other and the state. Anthropologists have carefully studied such communicative processes across a variety of sites, and considered the forms of mobilization that can occur around citizenship as well as the many ways that states’ sovereignty is graduated, creating distinct categories of citizens. Likewise, linguistic anthropologists are considering more and more the ways that distinct forms of communicating (uses of languages, genres, through various media and so forth) are vital to these processes. This course considers these various approaches, and in particular how they appraise the tension between mobilization in the name of equality and the numerous forms of inequality that vex modern citizenship. The course thus relates citizenship to other topics, especially public sphere, media, state, complicity, and language.

 

ANT 6032H S – Medicine and Health as Epistemology, Politics, and Social Practice (K. Bright) (return to timetable)

In this course, we look at potential links between the ethnography of health and broader inquiries into the nature of the body and the self by writers such as Merleau-Ponty, Mol, Butler, Foucault, Rose, and Lears. How are theorizations of materiality, desire, affect, faith, commodity, mobility, rationality, and temporality transforming medical anthropology and the objects it takes up? How can these ideas help us engage with new and old ethnographic objects such as digital technology, disability, diet, wellness, addiction, ethics, traditional medicine, biomedicine, bureaucracy, governance, and the post-human? The theoretical and ethnographic texts we engage in the course will offer points of insertion that students can engage in their own thinking and writing. In addition to weekly critical responses, students will prepare a final paper to be presented in a mini-symposium at the end of the course.

 

ANT 6033H S – ADV  Research Seminar III: Art(s) of living (M. Lambek & J. Sidnell) (return to timetable)

 

ANT 6034H S – Advanced Research Seminar IV: Inspiration and Immunity, Life and World: Reading Peter Sloterdijk (N. Dave/ co-taught with William Mazzarella (University of Chicago) (return to timetable)

This seminar is a collaborative enterprise between Professors Dave and Mazzarella, bringing groups of students in Toronto and Chicago into virtual interaction around a series of close readings of the work of the contemporary philosopher and cultural critic Peter Sloterdijk. We hope to use these readings as a point of departure for a collective conversation on critique, relation, ontology, posthumanism, ecology, dwelling, crisis and vitality.

 

ANT6035H S – Politics of Cohabitation: Infrastructure, Multiple Ontologies, Postcolonial Science and Technology Studies (STS) (S. Satsuka) (return to timetable)

This course explores the politics of life, or how people develop practices of living with other human and nonhuman beings on the earth. Since the late twentieth century, growing concerns over living conditions on earth have been addressed in public debates. The past few centuries of industrialization and the development of modern infrastructure have altered the environment extensively on a planetary scale. Geologists coined the term Anthropocene to describe the deep and wide scale of human impact on the earth. As a part of this impact, industrialization and infrastructure building have been inseparable from colonial expansion and neo-imperialism, and have generated severe inequalities and enacted violence on both human and nonhuman beings at local, regional, national and global scales. Yet, while living with these legacies, people have developed and continue to experiment with strategies and tactics to live on the earth with other beings. In order to understand these cohabitation practices and the politics among them, we need to attend to simultaneously happening multiple worlding practices and multispecies interactions, and contend with conventional ways of seeing and living in this world. This course examines a variety of material-semiotic practices humans have developed to carve out a space of cohabitation by critically engaging with three bodies of literature: anthropology of infrastructure, discussions on multiple ontologies, and postcolonial science and technology studies. By reading ethnographies and critical literature together, we will examine the limitations and possibilities opened up by these recent analytic developments, and the alternative worlds and worlding projects they examine.

 

ANT 6037H F – Advanced Research Seminar VII: Anthropology of Affects (V. Napolitano) (return to timetable)

This course explores selected theoretical and ethnographic engagements with affect theories that have influenced anthropological research. Hence a set of ethnographies/visual productions will be read/discussed during the course (for instance, on affects and the political, and on processes of ruination). These theoretical engagements  branch from key aspects of:  gendered medieval takes on affects, philosophy of history and materiality, and more recent spatial /architectural theories on transmission of affects. The course has a research component and part of the final evaluation can be produced both in a written as well as in a visual/mediatic form.

 

ANT 6038H S – Advanced Research Seminar VIII: Experts and Expertise (T. Sanders)(return to timetable)

This course might have been called Anthropology of the Contemporary, the Moderns, Euro-Americans or the West, but it also exceeds these categories. Experts and Expertise asks what happens to anthropologists, our knowledges and knowledge practices when we work – geographically, epistemologically and/or politically – very close to “home.” The course is divided into two parts. The first considers some of the methodological, epistemological and political challenges that arise when experts (i.e., anthropologists) study other experts (anthropologists, scientists, doctors, lawyers, bankers, development workers, etc.). The second part considers a range of expert knowledge practices, many of which are already (too) familiar to anthropologists: indicators, audit and quantification, interdisciplinarity, evidence-making, peer review, ethics review boards, documents, bureaucracies and meetings. The seminar’s overall aim is to enable anthropological insights into expertise and expert knowledge practices, our own included, as well as better understandings of the promise and perils of studying/working with other experts. Although the course dwells on expertise “at home,” it has important implications for how anthropologists imagine, theorise and practise anthropology “elsewhere” with “non-experts,” too.

 

ANT 6040H F – Research Design and Fieldwork Methods (CORE COURSE) (H. Luong) (return to timetable)

This course is designed for graduate students in sociocultural and linguistic anthropology who plan to write their research proposals and to design their field projects in the near future.  It will examine different kinds of fieldwork design and data collection techniques.

 

ANT 6055H S – Anthropology of Subjectivity and Personhood (G. Daswani) (return to timetable)

Personhood, subjectivity and human nature lies at the heart of anthropology inquiry: the meaning and relationship of self and other; how representations of human nature have developed and have shaped an imagination of a (Western) anthropos; the tensions between universality, particularity and singularity; the exchange between humans and non-humans. This course addresses the place of personhood and subjectivity from debates around themes such as the “Religious Subject”, the “Precarious Subject” and “Beyond-the-Subject”. The goal of the course is to introduce students to theoretical frameworks that have effectively been employed by anthropologists when studying personhood, subject and human nature, and also to think them through themes such as ‘will’, ‘blood’ and ‘cannibalism’.  This course will be run as a seminar with evaluation based on participation, one oral presentation, weekly reports, and a final paper.

 

ANT 6059H S – Anthropology of History (I. Kalmar) (return to timetable)

Historical perspectives in anthropology and ethnographic approaches to history.  We study the history of the closely related constructions of race, religion, language, culture, and nation (and implicitly related constructions like gender) starting from the late eighteenth century, and examine the traces and transformations of that history, as recognized in contemporary anthropological work in postcolonial societies and among indigenous populations and migrants in the West. We examine the historical effects of material inventions (money, paper, digital data storage and processing) on both society and on the nature of anthropological research.

 

ANT 6060H S – Anthropology & Indigenous Studies in North America (K. Maxwell) (return to timetable)

This course brings into dialogue contemporary Indigenous studies scholarship and recent ethnographies centred on Indigenous experience in North America.  We will contextualise these works by reading them alongside a) influential critiques of anthropology by prominent Indigenous scholars, and b) critical histories of the discipline and its multi-faceted relationship with settler colonialism in the United States and Canada.

ANT 6100H F- History of Anthropological Thought (S. Hillewaert & K. Kilroy-Marac) (return to timetable)

As an introduction to the history of anthropological thought, this MA-level course will
familiarize students with key thinkers, theoretical approaches, and ethnographic
innovations that shaped the discipline between the late 1800’s and the 1980’s. As a core course, HAT seeks to provide students with an understanding of how the subjects and objects of anthropological study have been defined. It likewise considers the kinds of knowledge, ethics, and modes of analysis these different approaches might demand. An understanding of the historically situated character of our discipline is a crucial component of our contemporary practice, and this includes taking seriously the intellectual genealogies out of which–and often against which—contemporary thought has emerged. Rather than offering a comprehensive history, our selection of topics and readings therefore aims to facilitate a critical understanding of key scholarly traditions that determined the discipline of anthropology today.

 

ANT 7002H S – Medical Anthropology II -Applied Biocultural Perspectives on Global Child Health (D. Sellen)(return to timetable)

Humans are exquisitely social animals and shared care of young is crucial to survival and adult functioning. In this class we sample, explore and discuss the variety of forms of human infant and young child care across space and time, of which parenting is just one.

Specifically, we explore perspectives generated by anthropologists, international public health practitioners and others interested in variation in childcare practices and its social determinants and health effects. We consider the complex, biocultural and bi-directional relationships between care and health in different social and ecological settings. Students can:

  • expand their understanding of patterns of human care-giving, and theories offered to explain them
  • think about the design, techniques and goals of anthropological and interdisciplinary research
  • consider the evolutionary history of childcare and its potential contemporary relevance
  • identify differences and commonalities in cross-cultural patterns of childcare
  • reflect on the salient care needs of human young
  • discuss variation in practice through the alternative “lenses” of diversity, disparity, and inequity
  • understand the relation between child care contexts and global health indicators
  • address implications for policy and the future of human well being and planetary health

 

JSA 5147H S – Anthropology/Sociology and Equity Studies in Education (M. Heller)(return to timetable

Language, Nationalism and Post-Nationalism

The purpose of this course is to examine the relationship between ideologies and practices of language and nation, from the period of the rise of the nation-State in the 19th century to current social changes related to the globalized new economy which challenge prevailing ideas about language and nation. We will focus in particular on language as a technique of regimentation, which helps produce and police populations; and as a terrain of struggle over access to and legitimation of relations of authority, power and inequality. We will examine European nationalism and its ties to colonialism, industrial capitalism, liberal democracy and modernity. We will then move to reactions to it in the form of linguistic minority movements, international auxiliary languages, fascism (in particular Nazism), and Communism. We will then touch briefly on the post WWII period, and focus the rest of the course on contemporary conditions of late capitalism, since the late 1980s, with a focus on the commodification of language and identity in the current economy; language and globalization; and current debates on the ecology of language and language endangerment.  Throughout we will also examine the role of linguists, anthropologists and other producers of discourse about language, nation and State in the construction of theories of nation, ethnicity, race and citizenship.

  

RLG 3290H S – Word and Worship (S. Coleman) (return to timetable)

How are we to analyze the words that Christians use? How might oral forms compare with written ones? And how should we try to understand the relationships between religious language and ritual action without seeing one as merely derived from the other? This course provides the opportunity both to explore theories of language use and to apply them to forms of verbal discourse ranging from prayers, sermons, speaking in tongues, and citing biblical verses to more informal narratives. Protestant and Catholic attitudes to religious language are examined in ways that sometimes reinforce, something challenge, theological distinctions between the two, and there will be the opportunity for students to bring their own texts (possibly derived from their own proposed areas of research) for analysis. Various techniques for the analysis of ritual texts are explored and evaluated, and the advantages and disadvantages of close textual analysis are discussed. While I will be presenting techniques of ‘reading’ texts derived mostly from social scientific literatures, you are welcome to incorporate other methods as appropriate